IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/poleco/v20y2004i4p1079-1095.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Mainstream economics, heterodoxy and academic exclusion: a review essay

Author

Listed:
  • Schiffman, Daniel A.

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Schiffman, Daniel A., 2004. "Mainstream economics, heterodoxy and academic exclusion: a review essay," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 1079-1095, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:20:y:2004:i:4:p:1079-1095
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176-2680(04)00064-3
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roger E. Backhouse & David Laidler, 2004. "What Was Lost with IS-LM," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(5), pages 25-56, Supplemen.
    2. Frank Ackerman, 2001. "Still dead after all these years: interpreting the failure of general equilibrium theory," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 119-139.
    3. repec:elg:eechap:17588_5 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. anonymous, 1999. "Interview with Arnold Harberger," The Region, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Mar, pages 18-21,36-40.
    5. Thomas Mayer, 2002. "Improving communication in economics: a task for methodologists," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 77-84.
    6. Hillman, Arye L., 2002. "The World Bank and the persistence of poverty in poor countries," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 783-795, November.
    7. Robert J. Blendon, 1997. "Bridging the Gap between the Public's and Economists' Views of the Economy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 105-118, Summer.
    8. David Colander, 2018. "The Death Of Neoclassical Economics," Chapters,in: How Economics Should Be Done, chapter 5, pages 46-62 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Colander, David, 2003. "The Aging of an Economist," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 157-176, June.
    10. Aschheim, Joseph & Tavlas, George S., 2004. "Academic exclusion: the case of Alexander Del Mar," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 31-60, March.
    11. Solow, Robert M, 1985. "Economic History and Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 328-331, May.
    12. anonymous, 1999. "An interview with Donald Brash," The Region, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Jun, pages 42-56.
    13. Bernanke, Ben S, 1983. "Nonmonetary Effects of the Financial Crisis in Propagation of the Great Depression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 257-276, June.
    14. Richard Lipsey, 2001. "Successes and failures in the transformation of economics," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 169-201.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. How the term “mainstream economics” became mainstream: a speculation
      by Beatrice Cherrier in INET Blog on 2016-05-23 14:18:09

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Glötzl, Florentin & Aigner, Ernest, 2015. "Pluralism in the Market of Science? A citation network analysis of economic research at universities in Vienna," Ecological Economic Papers 4730, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    2. Milo Bianchi & Magnus Henrekson, 2005. "Is Neoclassical Economics still Entrepreneurless?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 353-377, July.
    3. Florentin Gloetzl & Ernest Aigner, 2015. "Pluralism in the Market of Science? A citation network analysis of economic research at universities in Vienna," Ecological Economics Papers ieep5, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    4. Buchanan, Neil H., 2008. "How realistic is the supply/demand equilibrium story: A simple demonstration of false trading and its implications for market equilibrium," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 400-415, February.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:20:y:2004:i:4:p:1079-1095. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.