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Bank diversification, economic diversification?

  • Philip E. Strahan
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    Business cycle volatility has fallen in the United States during the past two decades. Trehan (2005) explains some of the possible mechanisms behind our now more stable economy. Some researchers have argued, for instance, that businesses manage inventory better today than in the past, or that innovations in financial markets have helped smooth out business fluctuations; others have emphasized better economic policy; still a third camp argues for nothing more than good luck. ; This Economic Letter explores in some detail one aspect of better finance. Changes in regulations during the 1980s and early 1990s facilitated a more integrated banking system, which in turn helped states share risks better.

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    File URL: http://www.frbsf.org/publications/economics/letter/2006/el2006-10.pdf
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    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in its journal FRBSF Economic Letter.

    Volume (Year): (2006)
    Issue (Month): may12 ()
    Pages:

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfel:y:2006:i:may12:n:2006-10
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    1. Mitchell A. Petersen & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2000. "Does Distance Still Matter? The Information Revolution in Small Business Lending," NBER Working Papers 7685, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Demsetz, Rebecca S & Strahan, Philip E, 1997. "Diversification, Size, and Risk at Bank Holding Companies," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(3), pages 300-313, August.
    3. Donald Morgan & Bertrand Rime & Philip E. Strahan, 2004. "Bank Integration and State Business Cycles," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(4), pages 1555-1584, November.
    4. Bernanke, Ben S, 1983. "Nonmonetary Effects of the Financial Crisis in Propagation of the Great Depression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 257-76, June.
    5. Jayaratne, Jith & Strahan, Philip E, 1998. "Entry Restrictions, Industry Evolution, and Dynamic Efficiency: Evidence from Commercial Banking," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 239-73, April.
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