IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/hop/hopeec/v36y2004i5p25-56.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

What Was Lost with IS-LM

Author

Listed:
  • Roger E. Backhouse
  • David Laidler

Abstract

The dominance of the IS-LM model in macroeconomics after 1937 led to the neglect and sometimes the outright loss of a number of important issues that had earlier been prominent in the literature. All these losses were related to the fact that economic life takes place over time, from which the IS-LM model's formal comparative static nature abstracted. Ideas about explicit dynamic modelling, inter-temporal choice and expectations, the analysis of policy issues in terms of regimes, and coordination failures in the inter-temporal allocation of resources, are discussed from this standpoint. The extent and importance of the losses are discussed, as are questions about how the intellectual dominance of IS-LM affected the forms in which some of these ideas have subsequently re-emerged.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Roger E. Backhouse & David Laidler, 2004. "What Was Lost with IS-LM," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(5), pages 25-56, Supplemen.
  • Handle: RePEc:hop:hopeec:v:36:y:2004:i:5:p:25-56
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hope.dukejournals.org/content/36/Suppl_1/25.full.pdf+html
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edward Nelson, 2004. "Money and the Transmission Mechanism in the Optimizing IS-LM Specification," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(5), pages 271-304, Supplemen.
    2. Michael D. Bordo & Anna J. Schwartz, 2004. "IS-LM and Monetarism," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(5), pages 217-239, Supplemen.
    3. Robert W. Dimand, 2004. "James Tobin and the Transformation of the IS-LM Model," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(5), pages 165-189, Supplemen.
    4. Laidler,David, 1999. "Fabricating the Keynesian Revolution," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521641739, April.
    5. Backhouse, Roger E, 1998. "If Mathematics Is Informal, Then Perhaps We Should Accept That Economics Must Be Informal Too," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(451), pages 1848-1858, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Esther-Mirjam Sent & Roger Backhouse & AW Bob Coats & John Davis & Harald Hagemann, 2005. "Perspectives on Michael A. Bernstein's A Perilous Progress: Economists and Public Purpose in Twentieth-Century America," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 127-146.
    2. Roger E. Backhouse & Bradley W. Bateman, 2012. "The Right Kind of an Economist: Friedman’s View of Keynes," Chapters,in: Keynes’s General Theory, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Schiffman, Daniel A., 2004. "Mainstream economics, heterodoxy and academic exclusion: a review essay," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 1079-1095, November.
    4. Uskali Mäki & Caterina Marchionni, 2011. "Economics as Usual: Geographical Economics Shaped by Disciplinary Conventions," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    IS-LM model;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hop:hopeec:v:36:y:2004:i:5:p:25-56. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Center for the History of Political Economy Webmaster). General contact details of provider: http://www.dukeupress.edu/Catalog/ViewProduct.php?viewby=journal&productid=45614 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.