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If Mathematics Is Informal, Then Perhaps We Should Accept That Economics Must Be Informal Too

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  • Backhouse, Roger E

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  • Backhouse, Roger E, 1998. "If Mathematics Is Informal, Then Perhaps We Should Accept That Economics Must Be Informal Too," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(451), pages 1848-1858, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:108:y:1998:i:451:p:1848-58
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tamás Dusek, 2008. "Methodological Monism in Economics," The Journal of Philosophical Economics, Bucharest Academy of Economic Studies, The Journal of Philosophical Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 26-50, March.
    2. Pillai N., Vijayamohanan, 2008. "In Quest of Truth: The War of Methods in Economics," MPRA Paper 8866, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Alejandro Diaz-Bautista, 2005. "La metodología de la investigación en la Economía Aplicada; The Research Methodology in Applied Economics," Method and Hist of Econ Thought 0509008, EconWPA.
    4. Rubinstein, Ariel, 2001. "A theorist's view of experiments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(4-6), pages 615-628, May.
    5. Miguel A. Duran, 2007. "Mathematical Needs and Economic Interpretations," Contributions to Political Economy, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(1), pages 1-16.
    6. Diecidue, Enrico & Wakker, Peter P, 2001. "On the Intuition of Rank-Dependent Utility," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 281-298, November.
    7. Turan Yay & Huseyin Tastan, 2010. "Invisible Hand in the Process of Making Economics or on the Method and Scope of Economics," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 57(1), pages 61-83, March.
    8. Roger E. Backhouse & David Laidler, 2004. "What Was Lost with IS-LM," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 36(5), pages 25-56, Supplemen.
    9. Alessandro Innocenti, 2004. "Paradoxes versus formalism in economics. Evidence from the early years of game theory and experimental economics," Department of Economics University of Siena 433, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    10. Waldstrøm, Christian & Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase, 2008. "On the capitalization and cultivation of social capital: Towards a neo-capital general science?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1495-1514, August.
    11. Sheila Dow, 2009. "History of Thought and Methodology in Pluralist Economics Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 41-57.
    12. Kakarot-Handtke, Egmont, 2011. "The propensity function as formal passkey to economic action," MPRA Paper 34051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Thiemann, Matthias & Aldegwy, Mohamed & Ibrocevic, Edin, 2016. "Understanding the shift from micro to macro-prudential thinking: A discursive network analysis," SAFE Working Paper Series 136, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    14. Aldegwy, Mohamed & Thiemann, Matthias, 2016. "How economics got it wrong: Formalism, equilibrium modelling and pseudo-optimization in banking regulatory studies," SAFE Working Paper Series 138, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.

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