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The changing face of mainstream economics

  • David Colander
  • Richard Holt
  • Barkley Rosser

This article argues that economics is currently undergoing a fundamental shift in its method, away from neoclassical economics and into something new. Although that something new has not been fully developed, it is beginning to take form and is centered on dynamics, recursive methods and complexity theory. The foundation of this change is coming from economists who are doing cutting edge work and influencing mainstream economics. These economists are defining and laying the theoretical groundwork for the fundamental shift that is occurring in the economics profession.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0953825042000256702
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Review of Political Economy.

Volume (Year): 16 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 485-499

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Handle: RePEc:taf:revpoe:v:16:y:2004:i:4:p:485-499
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  1. J. Barkley Rosser Jr. (ed.), 2004. "Complexity in Economics," Books, Edward Elgar, volume 0, number 2709.
  2. Colander, David, 2000. "The Death of Neoclassical Economics," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(02), pages 127-143, June.
  3. J. Barkley Rosser, 1999. "On the Complexities of Complex Economic Dynamics," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(4), pages 169-192, Fall.
  4. Colander, David & Klamer, Arjo, 1987. "The Making of an Economist," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 95-111, Fall.
  5. Smith, Vernon L, 1985. "Experimental Economics: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(1), pages 264-72, March.
  6. Tesfatsion, Leigh & Judd, Kenneth L., 2006. "Handbook of Computational Economics, Vol. 2: Agent-Based Computational Economics," Staff General Research Papers 10368, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  7. Aspromourgos, Tony, 1986. "On the Origins of the Term 'Neoclassical.'," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(3), pages 265-70, September.
  8. Veblen, Thorstein, 1899. "The Preconceptions of Economic Science I," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 13.
  9. Veblen, Thorstein, 1900. "The Preconceptions of Economic Science III," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 14.
  10. Debreu, Gerard, 1991. "The Mathematization of Economic Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 1-7, March.
  11. Veblen, Thorstein, 1899. "The Preconceptions of Economic Science II," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 13.
  12. Leigh Tesfatsion, 2002. "Agent-Based Computational Economics," Computational Economics 0203001, EconWPA, revised 15 Aug 2002.
  13. Stodder James, 1995. "The Evolution of Complexity in Primitive Exchange: Theory," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 1-31, February.
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