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Do liquidity or credit effects explain the behavior of the BKBM-LIBOR differential?


  • Poskitt, Russell
  • Waller, Bradley


This paper examines the evolution of the relationship between the onshore and offshore benchmarks for New Zealand dollar funding during the global financial crisis. In August 2007 the BKBM-LIBOR differential switched from positive to negative and then widened considerably following the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008, before narrowing gradually as the turmoil in financial markets subsided. Our structural regression model and decomposition analyses show that changes in liquidity, proxied by bid/ask spreads, largely explain the changes in the BKBM-LIBOR differential over this period and that credit risk factors only played a minor role. However our analysis also shows that bid/ask spreads in the offshore market price information regarding counterparty credit risk, suggesting that our initial results could understate the role played by credit risk factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Poskitt, Russell & Waller, Bradley, 2011. "Do liquidity or credit effects explain the behavior of the BKBM-LIBOR differential?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 173-193, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pacfin:v:19:y:2011:i:2:p:173-193

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Covrig, Vicentiu & Low, Buen Sin & Melvin, Michael, 2004. "A Yen is Not a Yen: TIBOR/LIBOR and the Determinants of the Japan Premium," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(01), pages 193-208, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexius, Annika & Birenstam, Helene & Eklund, Johanna, 2014. "The interbank market risk premium, central bank interventions, and measures of market liquidity," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(PA), pages 202-217.
    2. Woon K. Wong & Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal & Wanru Yao & Peter Howells, 2016. "Liquidity and Credit Risks in the UK’s Financial Crisis: How ‘Quantitative Easing’ changed the relationship," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2016/9, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    3. Stenfors, Alexis, 2014. "LIBOR deception and central bank forward (mis-)guidance: Evidence from Norway during 2007–2011," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 452-472.
    4. Cui, Jin & In, Francis & Maharaj, Elizabeth Ann, 2016. "What drives the Libor–OIS spread? Evidence from five major currency Libor–OIS spreads," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 358-375.


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