IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Foreign cultures, Sarbanes-Oxley Act and cross-delisting

  • Daugherty, Mary
  • Georgieva, Dobrina
Registered author(s):

    Using a sample of foreign firms listed in U.S. and delisting shares over the period 2000 and 2010, this paper studies the impact of Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) on the cross-delisting behavior of foreign firms based on the firm characteristics, legal tradition, overall culture and degree of individualism of the country of domicile. Pre-SOX, the propensity to delist is lower for firms from countries with cultural similarities to the U.S. and higher for firms from individualistic societies. Post-SOX these trends are reversed. Consistent with the existing research we find that the delisting decision of foreign firms cross-listed in the U.S. is based on the potential gains from listing based on the growth opportunities, length of presence in the U.S. and legal regulations of the country of domicile. Out findings provide evidence of the cultural factors that impact the competitiveness of U.S. capital markets.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1042444X1100034X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Multinational Financial Management.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 4 (October)
    Pages: 208-223

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:mulfin:v:21:y:2011:i:4:p:208-223
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mulfin

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Ugur Lel & Darius P. Miller, 2006. "International cross-listing, firm performance and top management turnover: a test of the bonding hypothesis," International Finance Discussion Papers 877, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Law and Finance," NBER Working Papers 5661, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Akhigbe, Aigbe & Martin, Anna D. & Nishikawa, Takeshi, 2009. "Changes in risk of foreign firms listed in the U.S. following Sarbanes-Oxley," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 193-205, July.
    4. Craig Doidge & G. Andrew Karolyi & René M. Stulz, 2010. "Why Do Foreign Firms Leave U.S. Equity Markets?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(4), pages 1507-1553, 08.
    5. Robert S. Shupp & Arlington Williams, 2003. "Risk Preference Differentials of Small Groups and Individuals," Working Papers 200301, Ball State University, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2006.
    6. Marco Pagano & Otto Randl & Ailsa A. Röell & Josef Zechner, 2000. "What Makes Stock Exchanges Succeed? Evidence from Cross-Listing Decisions," CSEF Working Papers 50, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    7. Andy C.W. Chui & Sheridan Titman & K.C. John Wei, 2010. "Individualism and Momentum around the World," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(1), pages 361-392, 02.
    8. Oren Fuerst, 1998. "A Theoretical Analysis of the Investor Protection Regulations Argument for Global Listing of Stocks," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm106, Yale School of Management.
    9. Doidge, Craig, 2004. "U.S. cross-listings and the private benefits of control: evidence from dual-class firms," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 519-553, June.
    10. Lee, Hei Wai & Valero, Magali, 2010. "Cross-listing effect on information environment of foreign firms: ADR type and country characteristics," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 20(4-5), pages 178-196, December.
    11. Sanger, Gary C. & Peterson, James D., 1990. "An Empirical Analysis of Common Stock Delistings," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 261-272, June.
    12. Fernandes, Nuno & Ferreira, Miguel A., 2008. "Does international cross-listing improve the information environment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 216-244, May.
    13. Doidge, Craig & Karolyi, G. Andrew & Lins, Karl V. & Miller, Darius & Stulz, Rene M., 2005. "Private Benefits of Control, Ownership, and the Cross-Listing Decision," Working Papers 05-1, University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School, Weiss Center.
    14. Reese, William Jr. & Weisbach, Michael S., 2002. "Protection of minority shareholder interests, cross-listings in the United States, and subsequent equity offerings," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 65-104, October.
    15. Douglass C. North, 1990. "A Transaction Cost Theory of Politics," Journal of Theoretical Politics, , vol. 2(4), pages 355-367, October.
    16. David W Loree & Stephen E Guisinger, 1995. "Policy and Non-Policy Determinants of U.S. Equity Foreign Direct Investment," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 26(2), pages 281-299, June.
    17. Siegel, Jordan, 2005. "Can foreign firms bond themselves effectively by renting U.S. securities laws?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(2), pages 319-359, February.
    18. James E. Rauch, 2001. "Business and Social Networks in International Trade," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1177-1203, December.
    19. Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Djankov, Simeon & La Porta, Rafael & Shleifer, Andrei, 2008. "The Law and Economics of Self-dealing," Scholarly Articles 2907526, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    20. Marosi, András & Massoud, Nadia, 2007. "Why Do Firms Go Dark?," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(02), pages 421-442, June.
    21. Abdallah, Wissam & Goergen, Marc, 2008. "Does corporate control determine the cross-listing location?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 183-199, June.
    22. Zhang, Ivy Xiying, 2007. "Economic consequences of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1-2), pages 74-115, September.
    23. Huberman, Gur, 2001. "Familiarity Breeds Investment," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 14(3), pages 659-80.
    24. Richard Portes and H�l�ne Rey., 2000. "The Determinants of Cross-Border Equity Flows: The Geography of Information," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C00-111, University of California at Berkeley.
    25. Oliver E. Williamson, 2000. "The New Institutional Economics: Taking Stock, Looking Ahead," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 595-613, September.
    26. Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd & Frijns, Bart, 2010. "A cultural explanation of the foreign bias in international asset allocation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 2121-2131, September.
    27. Marco Pagano & Ailsa A. Röell & Josef Zechner, 2002. "The Geography of Equity Listing: Why Do Companies List Abroad?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(6), pages 2651-2694, December.
    28. Doidge, Craig & Andrew Karolyi, G. & Stulz, Ren M., 2009. "Has New York become less competitive than London in global markets? Evaluating foreign listing choices over time," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(3), pages 253-277, March.
    29. Craig Doidge & G. Andrew Karolyi & Rene M. Stulz, 2001. "Why are Foreign Firms Listed in the U.S. Worth More?," NBER Working Papers 8538, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    30. Angel, James J. & Harris, Jeffrey H. & Panchapagesan, Venkatesh & Werner, Ingrid, 2004. "From Pink Slips to Pink Sheets: Liquidity and Shareholder Wealth Consequences of Nasdaq Delistings," Working Paper Series 2004-22, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    31. Leuz, Christian & Triantis, Alexander & Yue Wang, Tracy, 2008. "Why do firms go dark? Causes and economic consequences of voluntary SEC deregistrations," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2-3), pages 181-208, August.
    32. Fidrmuc, Jana P. & Jacob, Marcus, 2010. "Culture, agency costs, and dividends," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 321-339, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:mulfin:v:21:y:2011:i:4:p:208-223. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.