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An Empirical Analysis of Common Stock Delistings

Author

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  • Sanger, Gary C.
  • Peterson, James D.

Abstract

This paper presents an empirical analysis of firms that are delisted from a major stock exchange. The delisting process is described and stock price movements surrounding delisting are analyzed. For firms with prior announcements, equity values decline by approximately 8.5 percent on announcement day. For firms without prior announcements, a similar adjustment takes place between the last day of trading in the initial market and the close of the first day of trading in the new market. Four hypotheses concerning the decline in firm value are examined. These are the liquidity hypothesis, the management signalling hypothesis, the exchange certification hypothesis, and the downward sloping demand curve hypothesis. Evidence consistent with the liquidity hypothesis is presented in the paper. Unlike evidence on stock exchange listings, returns in the post-delisting period do not appear to be anomalous.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanger, Gary C. & Peterson, James D., 1990. "An Empirical Analysis of Common Stock Delistings," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(02), pages 261-272, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jfinqa:v:25:y:1990:i:02:p:261-272_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Doumet, Markus & Limbach, Peter & Theissen, Erik, 2015. "Ich bin dann mal weg: Werteffekte von Delistings deutscher Aktiengesellschaften nach dem Frosta-Urteil," CFR Working Papers 15-14, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).
    2. McConnell, John J. & Dybevik, Heidi J. & Haushalter, David & Lie, Erik, 1996. "A survey of evidence on domestic and international stock exchange listings with implications for markets and managers," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 347-376, December.
    3. Bernile, Gennaro & Jarrell, Gregg A., 2009. "The impact of the options backdating scandal on shareholders," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1-2), pages 2-26, March.
    4. Naohisa Goto & Konari Uchida, 2012. "How do banks resolve firms’ financial distress? Evidence from Japan," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 455-478, May.
    5. Daugherty, Mary & Georgieva, Dobrina, 2011. "Foreign cultures, Sarbanes-Oxley Act and cross-delisting," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 208-223, October.
    6. Asjeet S. Lamba & Walayet A. Khan, 1999. "Exchange Listings And Delistings: The Role Of Insider Information And Insider Trading," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 22(2), pages 131-146, June.
    7. Blennerhassett, Michael & Bowman, Robert G., 1998. "A change in market microstructure: the switch to electronic screen trading on the New Zealand stock exchange," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 8(3-4), pages 261-276, December.
    8. Crystal Lin & Kenneth Yung, 2006. "Equity Capital Flows and Demand for REITs," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 275-291, November.
    9. Bushee, Brian J. & Leuz, Christian, 2005. "Economic consequences of SEC disclosure regulation: evidence from the OTC bulletin board," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 233-264, June.
    10. You, Leyuan & Parhizgari, Ali M. & Srivastava, Suresh, 2012. "Cross-listing and subsequent delisting in foreign markets," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 200-216.
    11. Sun, Qian & Tang, Yuen-Kin & Tong, Wilson H. S., 2002. "The impacts of mass delisting: Evidence from Singapore and Malaysia," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 333-351, June.
    12. Jonathan Witmer, 2008. "An Examination of Canadian Firms Delisting from U.S. Exchanges," Staff Working Papers 08-11, Bank of Canada.
    13. Rhee, S. Ghon & Wu, Feng, 2012. "Anything wrong with breaking a buck? An empirical evaluation of NASDAQ's $1 minimum bid price maintenance criterion," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 258-285.
    14. Jonathan Macey & Maureen O'Hara & David Pompilio, 2008. "Down and Out in the Stock Market: The Law and Economics of the Delisting Process," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(4), pages 683-713, November.
    15. Andrew Ang & Assaf A. Shtauber & Paul C. Tetlock, 2013. "Asset Pricing in the Dark: The Cross-Section of OTC Stocks," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(12), pages 2985-3028.
    16. Park, Jinwoo & Lee, Posang & Park, Yun W., 2014. "Information effect of involuntary delisting and informed trading," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 251-269.
    17. Constant Djama & Isabelle Martinez & Stéphanie Serve, 2012. "What do we know about delistings? A survey of the literature," Post-Print hal-00937899, HAL.
    18. Terrence Martell & Gwendolyn Webb, 2008. "The performance of stocks that are reverse split," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 253-279, April.
    19. Liu, Shinhua & Stowe, John D. & Hung, Ken, 2012. "Why U.S. firms delist from the Tokyo stock exchange: An empirical analysis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 62-70.
    20. Mahajan, Arvind & Furtado, Eugene P. H., 1996. "Exchange rate regimes and international market segmentation: Evidence from pricing effects of international listings," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 153-168.
    21. Kalay, Avner & Portniaguina, Evgenia, 2001. "Swimming against the tides: : The case of Aeroflex move from NYSE to Nasdaq," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 261-267, June.
    22. Kashefi Pour, Eilnaz & Lasfer, Meziane, 2013. "Why do companies delist voluntarily from the stock market?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 4850-4860.
    23. Peterson, David R & Peterson, Pamela P, 1992. "A Further Understanding of Stock Distributions: The Case of Reverse Stock Splits," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 15(3), pages 189-205, Fall.
    24. Williams, David R., 2013. "Human and financial capital as determinants of biopharmaceutical IPO de-listings," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(12), pages 2612-2618.

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