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Aggregate employment, real business cycles, and superior information

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  • Boileau, Martin
  • Normandin, Michel

Abstract

We test whether dynamic, stochastic, general equilibrium artificial economies associated with several labor market institutions provide an adequate characterization of aggregate employment volatility and dynamics. Our test is robust to possible misspecifications about the information set used by economic agents to forecast future events. Accounting for the agents' superior information, we find that the divisible labor, indivisible labor, and labor hoarding structures replicate employment volatility, in contrast to the nominal wage contracts and labor adjustment costs structures. Also, the labor hoarding structure provides a substantially better account of employment dynamics than the other labor market structures.
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  • Boileau, Martin & Normandin, Michel, 2002. "Aggregate employment, real business cycles, and superior information," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 495-520, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:49:y:2002:i:3:p:495-520
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    Cited by:

    1. Boileau, Martin & Normandin, Michel, 2008. "Dynamics of the current account and interest differentials," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 35-52, January.
    2. James M. Nason & Gregor W. Smith, 2008. "Identifying the new Keynesian Phillips curve," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(5), pages 525-551.
    3. Denis Larocque & Michel Normandin, 2004. "Econometric Inference, Cyclical Fluctuations, and Superior Information," Cahiers de recherche 0434, CIRPEE.
    4. Michel Normandin, 2006. "Fiscal Policies, External Deficits, and Budget Deficits," Cahiers de recherche 06-05, HEC Montréal, Institut d'économie appliquée.
    5. Martin Boileau & Michel Normandin, 2012. "Do tax cuts generate twin deficits? A multi-country analysis," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1667-1699, November.
    6. Boileau, Martin & Normandin, Michel, 2003. "Capacity utilization, superior information, and the business cycle," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 283-309, September.
    7. Boileau, Martin & Normandin, Michel, 2003. "Labor hoarding, superior information, and business cycle dynamics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 397-418, November.
    8. Johri, Alok & Letendre, Marc-Andre, 2007. "What do `residuals' from first-order conditions reveal about DGE models?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(8), pages 2744-2773, August.
    9. Martin Boileau & Michel Normandin, 1999. "Capacity Utilization and the Dynamics of Business Cycle Fluctuations," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 92, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    10. Foued Chihi & Michel Normandin, 2008. "External and Budget Deficits in Developing Countries," Cahiers de recherche 0819, CIRPEE.
    11. Martin Boileau & Michel Normandin, 2002. "General equilibrium macroeconomic models and superior information," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(11), pages 727-730.
    12. Chihi, Foued & Normandin, Michel, 2013. "External and budget deficits in some developing countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 77-98.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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