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Conservatism and liquidity traps

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  • Nakata, Taisuke
  • Schmidt, Sebastian

Abstract

In an economy with an occasionally binding zero lower bound (ZLB) constraint, the anticipation of future ZLB episodes creates a trade-off for discretionary central banks between inflation and output stabilization. As a consequence, inflation systematically falls below target even when the policy rate is above zero. Appointing Rogoff’s (1985) conservative central banker mitigates this deflationary bias away from the ZLB and enhances welfare by improving allocations both at and away from the ZLB.

Suggested Citation

  • Nakata, Taisuke & Schmidt, Sebastian, 2019. "Conservatism and liquidity traps," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 37-47.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:104:y:2019:i:c:p:37-47
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2018.09.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Seneca, Martin, 2016. "Risk shocks close to the zero lower bound," Bank of England working papers 606, Bank of England.
    2. Taisuke Nakata & Sebastian Schmidt, 2019. "Gradualism and Liquidity Traps," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 31, pages 182-199, January.
    3. Bilbiie, Florin Ovidiu, 2017. "The Puzzle, the Power, and the Dark Side: Forward Guidance Redux," CEPR Discussion Papers 12231, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Armenter, Roc, 2013. "The perils of nominal targets," Working Papers 14-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, revised 04 Feb 2014.
    5. Taisuke Nakata & Ryota Ogaki & Sebastian Schmidt & Paul Yoo, 2018. "Attenuating the Forward Guidance Puzzle : Implications for Optimal Monetary Policy," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-049, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    6. Taisuke Nakata & Sebastian Schmidt & Paul Yoo, 2018. "Speed Limit Policy and Liquidity Traps," IMES Discussion Paper Series 18-E-06, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    7. Taisuke Nakata, 2018. "Reputation and Liquidity Traps," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 28, pages 252-268, April.
    8. Taisuke Nakata & Sebastian Schmidt, 2019. "Gradualism and Liquidity Traps," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 31, pages 182-199, January.
    9. Barthélemy, Jean & Mengus, Eric, 2018. "The signaling effect of raising inflation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 488-516.
    10. Holden, Thomas, 2016. "Existence and uniqueness of solutions to dynamic models with occasionally binding constraints," EconStor Preprints 130142, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    11. Andrea Ajello & Thomas Laubach & J. David Lopez-Salido & Taisuke Nakata, 2016. "Financial Stability and Optimal Interest-Rate Policy," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-067, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    12. Taisuke Nakata, 2018. "Reputation and Liquidity Traps," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 28, pages 252-268, April.
    13. Nakata, Taisuke, 2016. "Optimal fiscal and monetary policy with occasionally binding zero bound constraints," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 220-240.
    14. Gauti B. Eggertsson & Sanjay R. Singh, 2016. "Log-linear Approximation versus an Exact Solution at the ZLB in the New Keynesian Model," NBER Working Papers 22784, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Isabel Cairo & Jae W. Sim, 2018. "Income Inequality, Financial Crises, and Monetary Policy," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2018-048, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
    16. Schmidt, Sebastian, 2018. "Time-consistent monetary policy, terms of trade manipulation and welfare in open economies," Working Paper Series 2128, European Central Bank.
    17. Charles Evans & Jonas Fisher & Francois Gourio & Spencer Krane, 2015. "Risk Management for Monetary Policy Near the Zero Lower Bound," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(1 (Spring), pages 141-219.
    18. Rodríguez Arosemena, Nicolás, 2018. "The Dominium Mundi Game and the Case for Artificial Intelligence in Economics and the Law," MPRA Paper 90560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Tambakis, Demosthenes N., 2015. "Determinate liquidity traps," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 126-132.
    20. Lieberknecht, Philipp, 2018. "Financial Frictions, the Phillips Curve and Monetary Policy," MPRA Paper 89429, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Michael Lamla & Damjan Pfajfar & Lea Rendell, 2018. "Confidence in Central Banks and Inflation Expectations," 2018 Meeting Papers 945, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    22. Koeda, Junko, 2019. "Macroeconomic effects of quantitative and qualitative monetary easing measures," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 121-141.
    23. Bilbiie, Florin Ovidiu, 2018. "Neo-Fisherian Policies and Liquidity Traps," CEPR Discussion Papers 13334, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Deflationary bias; Inflation conservatism; Inflation targeting; Liquidity traps; Zero lower bound;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination

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