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The external returns to education: UK evidence using repeated cross-sections

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  • Kirby, Simon
  • Riley, Rebecca

Abstract

Augmenting a Mincerian earnings function with industry level data we estimate the external return to schooling for a repeated cross-section of individuals in the UK over the period 1994-2004. For men age 30-49 we find that a one year increase in the industry average level of schooling is associated with an increase in individual wages of 2.6 to 3.9%, around 2 to 3 fifths of the private return to schooling. We illustrate the sensitivity of external return estimates to industry ICT use and union density, and individuals' own level of schooling.

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  • Kirby, Simon & Riley, Rebecca, 2008. "The external returns to education: UK evidence using repeated cross-sections," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 619-630, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:15:y:2008:i:4:p:619-630
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    Cited by:

    1. Simone N. Tuor Sartore & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2012. "Another Effect of Group Diversity: Educational Composition and Workers’ Pay," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0078, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    2. Wen Fan & Yuanyuan Ma, 2012. "Estimating the External Returns to Education: Evidence from China," Working Papers 201220, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Michael Landesmann & Sebastian Leitner & Robert Stehrer & Terry Ward, 2009. "Skills and Industrial Competitiveness," wiiw Research Reports 356, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Ozan Bakis & Nurhan Davutyan & Haluk Levent & Sezgin Polat, 2010. "External Returns to Higher Education in Turkey," Working Papers 517, Economic Research Forum, revised 04 Jan 2010.
    5. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Vassilis Tselios, 2012. "Welfare Regimes and the Incentives to Work and Get Educated," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 44(1), pages 125-149, January.
    6. Rasmus Thönnessen & Erich Gundlach, 2013. "The size of human capital externalities: cross-country evidence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 157(3), pages 671-689, December.
    7. Braakmann Nils, 2010. "Fields of Training, Plant Characteristics and the Gender Wage Gap in Entry Wages Among Skilled Workers – Evidence from German Administrative Data," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 230(1), pages 27-41, February.
    8. Kristen Monaco & Steven Yamarik, 2015. "Are there human capital externalities in U.S. states? Evidence from the Current Population Survey," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2345-2362.
    9. repec:sdo:regaec:v:24:y:2015:i:2_10 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Matthew Calver, 2015. "Closing the Aboriginal Education Gap in Canada: Assessing Progress and Estimating the Economic Benefits," CSLS Research Reports 2015-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    11. Uschi Backes-Gellner & Christian Rupietta & Simone N. Tuor, 2011. "Educational Spillovers at the Firm Level: Who Benefits from Whom?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0065, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Feb 2015.
    12. Sarah Brown & Karl Taylor, "undated". "Reservation Wages, Expected wages and the duration of Unemployment: evidence from British Panel data," Working Papers 2009001, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    13. Stenberg, Anders, 2011. "Using longitudinal data to evaluate publicly provided formal education for low skilled," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1262-1280.
    14. Strawinski, Pawel, 2009. "External Return to Education in Europe," IRISS Working Paper Series 2009-09, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    15. Anders Stenberg & Xavier Luna & Olle Westerlund, 2014. "Does Formal Education for Older Workers Increase Earnings? — Evidence Based on Rich Data and Long-term Follow-up," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 28(2), pages 163-189, June.
    16. Filiztekin, Alpay, 2011. "Social returns to education in a developing country," MPRA Paper 35124, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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