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The external returns to education: UK evidence using repeated cross-sections

  • Kirby, Simon
  • Riley, Rebecca

Augmenting a Mincerian earnings function with industry level data we estimate the external return to schooling for a repeated cross-section of individuals in the UK over the period 1994-2004. For men age 30-49 we find that a one year increase in the industry average level of schooling is associated with an increase in individual wages of 2.6 to 3.9%, around 2 to 3 fifths of the private return to schooling. We illustrate the sensitivity of external return estimates to industry ICT use and union density, and individuals' own level of schooling.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Labour Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 619-630

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Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:15:y:2008:i:4:p:619-630
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco

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