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Human resource constraints for electricity regulation in developing countries: Developments since 2001

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  • Pollitt, Michael
  • Stern, Jon

Abstract

We provide strong evidence that there are significant human resource constraints which limit the scale and, hence, the scope and potential effectiveness of electricity/energy regulatory agencies in developing countries. We summarise the key findings in our earlier Domah, Pollitt and Stern paper (2002). We then consider what new evidence there is on regulatory staffing levels since 2001/2002 and on the implications of high fixed costs for developing countries' electricity and regulatory policies. Our conclusion is that little has changed over the intervening period.

Suggested Citation

  • Pollitt, Michael & Stern, Jon, 2011. "Human resource constraints for electricity regulation in developing countries: Developments since 2001," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 53-60, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juipol:v:19:y:2011:i:2:p:53-60
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andres, Luis & Guasch, Jose Luis & Azumendi, Sebastian Lopez, 2008. "Regulatory governance and sector performance : methodology and evaluation for Electricity distribution in Latin America," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4494, The World Bank.
    2. Ashley C. Brown & Jon Stern & Bernard Tenenbaum, 2006. "Handbook for Evaluating Infrastructure Regulatory Systems," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7030.
    3. Estache, Antonio & Rossi, Martin A., 2008. "Regulatory agencies : impact on firm performance and social welfare," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4509, The World Bank.
    4. Stern, Jon & Cubbin, John, 2005. "Regulatory effectiveness : the impact of regulation and regulatory governance arrangements on electricity industry outcomes," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3536, The World Bank.
    5. Laffont,Jean-Jacques, 2005. "Regulation and Development," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521840187, March.
    6. Xeni Dassiou & Jon Stern, 2009. "Infrastructure Contracts: Trust and Institutional Updating," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 35(1), pages 171-216, September.
    7. Preetum Domah & Pollitt, M.G. & Jon Stern, 2002. "Modelling the Costs of Electricity Regulation: Evidence of Human Resource Constraints in Developing Countries," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0229, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    8. Vivien Foster & Cecilia Briceno-Garmendia, 2010. "Africa's Infrastructure : A Time for Transformation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2692.
    9. John Cubbin & Jon Stern, 2006. "The Impact of Regulatory Governance and Privatization on Electricity Industry Generation Capacity in Developing Economies," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 115-141.
    10. Andres, Luis & Guasch, Jose Luis & Diop, Makhtar & Azumendi, Sebastian Lopez, 2007. "Assessing the governance of electricity regulatory agencies in the Latin American and the Caribbean region : a benchmarking analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4380, The World Bank.
    11. Mota, R.L., 2004. "‘Comparing Brazil and USA electricity performance; what was the impact of privatisation?’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0423, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Haney, Aoife Brophy & Pollitt, Michael G., 2011. "Exploring the determinants of “best practice” benchmarking in electricity network regulation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 7739-7746.
    2. Tooraj Jamasb & Rabindra Nepal & Govinda Timilsina & Michael Toman, 2014. "Energy Sector Reform, Economic Efficiency and Poverty Reduction," Discussion Papers Series 529, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    3. Nepal, Rabindra, 2012. "Roles and potentials of renewable energy in less-developed economies: The case of Nepal," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 2200-2206.
    4. Thamae, Leboli Z. & Thamae, Retselisitsoe I. & Thamae, Thimothy M., 2015. "Assessing a decade of regulatory performance for the Lesotho electricity industry," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 91-101.
    5. Mirzaei, Mohammad Javad & Dashti, Reza & Kazemi, Ahad & Amirioun, Mohammad Hassan, 2015. "An asset-management model for use in the evaluation and regulation of public-lighting systems," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 19-28.

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