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The impact of government expenditure on economic growth: How sensitive to the level of development?

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  • Wu, Shih-Ying
  • Tang, Jenn-Hong
  • Lin, Eric S.

Abstract

Previous studies generally find mixed empirical evidence on the relationship between government spending and economic growth. In this paper, we re-examine the causal relationship between government expenditure and economic growth by conducting the panel Granger causality test recently developed by (Hurlin, 2004) and (Hurlin, 2005) and by utilizing a richer panel data set which includes 182 countries that cover the period from 1950 to 2004. Our empirical results strongly support both Wagner's law and the hypothesis that government spending is helpful to economic growth regardless of how we measure the government size and economic growth. When the countries are disaggregated by income levels and the degree of corruption, our results also confirm the bi-directional causality between government activities and economic growth for the different subsamples of countries, with the exception of the low-income countries. It is suggested that the distinct feature of the low-income countries is likely owing to their inefficient governments and inferior institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Wu, Shih-Ying & Tang, Jenn-Hong & Lin, Eric S., 2010. "The impact of government expenditure on economic growth: How sensitive to the level of development?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 804-817, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:32:y::i:6:p:804-817
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. António Afonso & João Jalles, 2016. "Economic performance, government size, and institutional quality," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 83-109, February.
    2. KARGI, Bilal, 2013. "Bütçe Büyüklükleri/Performansı ve Büyüme Verileri: Türkiye Üzerine (2000:01-2012.03) Zaman Serileri Analizi
      [Budget Size / Performance and Growth Data: Time Series Analysis (2000:01-2012:03) on Tur
      ," MPRA Paper 55705, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Calderón, César & Fuentes, J. Rodrigo, 2012. "Removing the constraints for growth: Some guidelines," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 948-970.
    4. repec:lde:journl:y:2018:i:88:p:77-108 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:lje:journl:v:19:y:2015:i:1:p:71-103 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Jacobo Campo Robledo & Henry Antonio Mendoza Tolosa, 2014. "Gasto Público y Crecimiento Económico regional en Colombia (1984 - 2012)," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO UCATOLICA 012425, UNIVERSIDAD CATOLICA DE COLOMBIA.
    7. Nicholas Odhiambo, 2015. "Government Expenditure and Economic Growth in South Africa: an Empirical Investigation," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 393-406, September.
    8. repec:eco:journ1:2018-01-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2015. "Defence And Non-Defence Spending In The Usa: Stimuli To Economic Growth? Comparative Findings From A Semiparametric Approach," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 359-370, October.
    10. Kollias, Christos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2013. "Guns, highways and economic growth in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 449-455.
    11. Carsten Colombier, 2015. "Government Size And Growth: A Survey And Interpretation Of The Evidence – A Comment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(5), pages 887-895, December.
    12. Samad Bashirli & Ilkin Sabiroglu, 2013. "Testing Wagner’s Law in an Oil-Exporting Economy: the Case of Azerbaijan," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 20(3), pages 295-307, November.
    13. Hasnul, Al Gifari, 2015. "The effects of government expenditure on economic growth: the case of Malaysia," MPRA Paper 71254, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. repec:col:000174:016023 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:rss:jnljee:v4i2p6 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Hany Abdel-Latif & Tapas Mishra, 2016. "Asymmetric Growth Impact of Social Policy: A Post-Shock Policy Scenario for Egypt," Working Papers 1035, Economic Research Forum, revised Aug 2016.
    17. González-Fernández, Marcos & González-Velasco, Carmen, 2014. "Shadow economy, corruption and public debt in Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 1101-1117.
    18. Mehdi Hajamini & Mohammad Ali Falahi, 2014. "The nonlinear impact of government consumption expenditure on economic growth: Evidence from low and low-middle income countries," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-15, December.
    19. Sadia Shabbir & Hafiz M. Yasin, 2015. "Implications of Public External Debt for Social Spending: A Case Study of Selected Asian Developing Countries," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 20(1), pages 71-103, Jan-June.
    20. Abdon, Arnelyn May & Estrada, Gemma Esther & Lee, Minsoo & Park, Donghyun, 2014. "Fiscal Policy and Growth in Developing Asia," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 412, Asian Development Bank.

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