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Decision dilemmas facing managers: recognizing the value of learning while making sequential decisions

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  • Chi, T.
  • Nystrom, P. C.

Abstract

The paper brings attention to an often neglected factor that can have a significant impact on whether a multi-stage project is worth continuing--the potential for learning in its development process. After explicating the economics of a project's learning potential, the paper explores its implications for the practice of project management and for the design of future experimental studies on managerial behavior in funding multi-stage projects.

Suggested Citation

  • Chi, T. & Nystrom, P. C., 1995. "Decision dilemmas facing managers: recognizing the value of learning while making sequential decisions," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 303-312, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jomega:v:23:y:1995:i:3:p:303-312
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Yong & James, Barclay & Madhavan, Ravi & Mahoney, Joseph T., 2006. "Real Options: Taking Stock and Looking Ahead," Working Papers 06-0114, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, College of Business.
    2. Bragger, Jennifer DeNicolis & Bragger, Donald & Hantula, Donald A. & Kirnan, Jean, 1998. "Hyteresis and Uncertainty: The Effect of Uncertainty on Delays to Exit Decisions," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 229-253, June.

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