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Exiting unemployment: How do program effects depend on individual coping strategies?

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  • Andersen, Signe Hald

Abstract

This paper analyses if individual coping strategies explain heterogeneous effects of participation in active labour market programs (ALMPs) on reemployment probabilities for the unemployed. I use survey data linked with administrative data from Statistics Denmark and focus on respondents who are unemployed or participating in ALMPs (n = 1310). To account for selection bias I analyse the data with a mixed logit model. I find that the coping strategies displayed by the unemployed persons explain heterogeneous effects of participation in ALMPs.

Suggested Citation

  • Andersen, Signe Hald, 2011. "Exiting unemployment: How do program effects depend on individual coping strategies?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 248-258, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:32:y:2011:i:2:p:248-258
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    References listed on IDEAS

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