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Soft information and economic activity: Evidence from the Beige Book

Author

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  • Sadique, Shibley
  • In, Francis
  • Veeraraghavan, Madhu
  • Wachtel, Paul

Abstract

This study employs text-analysis software to analyze the contents of the Federal Reserve Beige Book summary of national economic and business conditions, with a particular focus on the predictive content of the text. We show that the Beige Book language is a good predictor of economic turning points as it often provides an early indication of future economic activities. During economic upswings, positive tone becomes more prominent and negative tone becomes less prominent. In addition, this study is the first to document that Beige Book tone affects stock market volatility and trading volume.

Suggested Citation

  • Sadique, Shibley & In, Francis & Veeraraghavan, Madhu & Wachtel, Paul, 2013. "Soft information and economic activity: Evidence from the Beige Book," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 81-92.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:37:y:2013:i:c:p:81-92
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmacro.2013.01.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:jimfin:v:79:y:2017:i:c:p:136-156 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Textual analysis; Beige Book; General Inquirer; Forecasting; Economic fluctuations;

    JEL classification:

    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General
    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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