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Bank Charter Value and the Viability of the Japanese Convoy System

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  • Spiegel, Mark M.

Abstract

This paper compares the performance of a convoy banking system, similar to that which prevailed in Japan, to a fixed-premium deposit insurance regime. Under this system, failed banks are merged with healthy banks, rather than closed, so that the banking system itself provides the safety net for guaranteed deposits. While neither regime is generally preferable over the other, the results show that the performance of the convoy system is more sensitive to changes in bank charter values and the overall health of the banking system. The recent breakdown of the convoy system may therefore be partly attributable to adverse changes in these characteristics in the Japanese banking system.
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Suggested Citation

  • Spiegel, Mark M., 2000. "Bank Charter Value and the Viability of the Japanese Convoy System," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 149-168, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jjieco:v:14:y:2000:i:3:p:149-168
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap, 2000. "The Japanese Banking Crisis: Where Did It Come From and How Will It End?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999, Volume 14, pages 129-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kenneth Kasa & Mark M. Spiegel, 2008. "The role of relative performance in bank closure decisions," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 17-29.
    3. Giammarino, Ronald M & Lewis, Tracy R & Sappington, David E M, 1993. " An Incentive Approach to Banking Regulation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(4), pages 1523-1542, September.
    4. Thomas F. Cargill & Michael M. Hutchison & Takatoshi Ito, 1997. "The Political Economy of Japanese Monetary Policy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262032473, January.
    5. Mark M. Spiegel, 1999. "Moral hazard under the Japanese "convoy" banking system," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 3-13.
    6. Nobuyoshi Yamori, 1999. "Stock Market Reaction to the Bank Liquidation in Japan: A Case for the Informational Effect Hypothesis," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 15(1), pages 57-68, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mark Spiegel & Nobuyoshi Yamori, 2003. "Financial Turbulence and the Japanese Main Bank Relationship," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 23(3), pages 205-223, June.
    2. Hoshi, Takeo, 2002. "The convoy system for insolvent banks: how it originally worked and why it failed in the 1990s," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 155-180, April.
    3. Mark M. Spiegel & Nobuyoshi Yamori, 2000. "The evolution of "too-big-to-fail" policy in Japan: evidence from market equity values," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 00-01, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    4. Mark M. Spiegel & Nobuyoshi Yamori, 2000. "Financial turbulence and the Japanese main bank," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 2000-04, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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