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The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle revisited: A Monte Carlo study

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  • Caporale, Guglielmo Maria
  • Panopoulou, Ekaterini
  • Pittis, Nikitas

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  • Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Panopoulou, Ekaterini & Pittis, Nikitas, 2005. "The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle revisited: A Monte Carlo study," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(7), pages 1143-1149, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:24:y:2005:i:7:p:1143-1149
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Coakley, Jerry & Kulasi, Farida & Smith, Ron, 1996. "Current Account Solvency and the Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(436), pages 620-627, May.
    2. Mamingi, Nlandu, 1997. "Saving-investment correlations and capital mobility: The experience of developing countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 605-626, December.
    3. Whitney K. Newey & Kenneth D. West, 1994. "Automatic Lag Selection in Covariance Matrix Estimation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 61(4), pages 631-653.
    4. Andrews, Donald W K, 1991. "Heteroskedasticity and Autocorrelation Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(3), pages 817-858, May.
    5. Feldstein, Martin & Horioka, Charles, 1980. "Domestic Saving and International Capital Flows," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 90(358), pages 314-329, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Piotr Misztal, 2011. "The Feldstein-Horioka Hypothesis in Countries with Varied Levels of Economic Development," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 5(2), June.
    2. Ketenci, Natalya, 2013. "The Feldstein–Horioka puzzle in groupings of OECD members: A panel approach," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 76-87.
    3. Jérome Hericourt & Mathilde Maurel, 2006. "A new look at the Feldstein-Horioka puzzle: a European-regional perspective," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 49(2), pages 147-168.
    4. Margarita Katsimi & Thomas Moutos, 2009. "A Note On Human Capital And The Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 77(3), pages 398-409, June.
    5. Eslamloueyan, Karim & Jafari, Mahboubeh, 2014. "Financial crisis and saving–investment dynamics in the presence of cross-sectional dependence: The case of East Asia," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 209-220.
    6. Katsimi, Margarita & Moutos, Thomas, 2011. "Inequality and the US import demand function," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 492-506, April.
    7. Andrew Phiri, 2017. "The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle and the global financial crisis: Evidence from South Africa using asymmetric cointegation analysis," Working Papers 1701, Department of Economics, Nelson Mandela University, revised May 2017.
    8. Kumar Narayan, Paresh, 2005. "The relationship between saving and investment for Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 293-309, August.
    9. Ketenci, Natalya, 2012. "The Feldstein–Horioka Puzzle and structural breaks: Evidence from EU members," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 262-270.
    10. Natalya Ketenci, N., 2010. "The Feldstein Horioka Puzzle by groups of OECD members: the panel approach," MPRA Paper 25848, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:39:y:2017:i:2:p:324-332 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Kollias, Christos & Mylonidis, Nikolaos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2008. "The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle across EU members: Evidence from the ARDL bounds approach and panel data," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 380-387.
    13. Dilem Yıldırım & Ethem Erdem Orman, 2016. "The Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle in the Presence of Structural Breaks: Evidence from China," ERC Working Papers 1601, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Jan 2016.
    14. Costantini, Mauro & Gutierrez, Luciano, 2013. "Capital mobility and global factor shocks," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 513-515.
    15. Phiri, Andrew, 2017. "The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle and the global recession period: Evidence from South Africa using asymmetric cointegration analysis," MPRA Paper 79096, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Margarita Katsimi & Thomas Moutos, 2007. "Human Capital and the Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle," CESifo Working Paper Series 1914, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Ekrem ERDEM & Ahmet KOSEOGLU & Ali Gokhan YUCEL, 2016. "Testing the validity of the Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle: New evidence from structural breaks for Turkey," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(2(607), S), pages 17-26, Summer.
    18. Tarlok Singh, 2007. "Intertemporal Optimizing Models Of Trade And Current Account Balance: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(1), pages 25-64, February.
    19. Singh, Tarlok, 2008. "Testing the Saving-Investment correlations in India: An evidence from single-equation and system estimators," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 1064-1079, September.
    20. Holmes, Mark J. & Otero, Jesús, 2014. "Re-examining the Feldstein–Horioka and Sachs' views of capital mobility: A heterogeneous panel setup," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-11.
    21. Solarin Sakiru Adebola & Jauhari Dahalan, 2012. "Capital Mobility: An Application of Savings-Investment Link for Tunisia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 2(1), pages 1-11.
    22. Seyi Saint Akadiri & Itodo Idoko Ahmed & Ojonugwa Usman & Medhi Seraj, 2016. "The Feldstein - Horioka Paradox, A Case Study of Turkey," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 6(12), pages 744-749, December.

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