IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jhouse/v18y2009i1p13-24.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Marital history and home ownership: Evidence from Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Hendershott, Patric H.
  • Ong, Rachel
  • Wood, Gavin A.
  • Flatau, Paul

Abstract

The relative cost of owning and renting housing and housing affordability have been clearly established as important determinants of home ownership. But the roles of marital status and history have been largely ignored. In this paper we show that both current marital status and past history affect ownership. Past history matters because wealth accumulation is greater among couple households than singles owing largely to economies of scale in housing consumption. Moreover, wealth is lost upon divorce. In effect, past marital history affects the affordability of owner housing. This result is shown in the estimation of model explaining wealth, leverage and tenure choice using Australian datasets.

Suggested Citation

  • Hendershott, Patric H. & Ong, Rachel & Wood, Gavin A. & Flatau, Paul, 2009. "Marital history and home ownership: Evidence from Australia," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 13-24, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:18:y:2009:i:1:p:13-24
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1051-1377(08)00032-6
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jamie Chua & Paul W. Miller, 2005. "The Immigrant Housing Market: Analyses for Australia," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 05-23, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    2. Jones Lawrence D., 1995. "Testing the Central Prediction of Housing Tenure Transition Models," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 50-73, July.
    3. Addison, John T & Portugal, Pedro, 1987. "On the Distributional Shape of Unemployment Duration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(3), pages 521-526, August.
    4. Gavin A. Wood & Richard Watson & Paul Flatau & Rachel Ong, 2006. "Transaction Costs, Deposit Requirements And First-Home Ownership," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 25(3), pages 252-271, September.
    5. Boehm, Thomas P., 1993. "Income, Wealth Accumulation, and First-Time Homeownership: An Intertemporal Analysis," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 16-30, December.
    6. Steven C. Bourassa & Ming Yin, 2006. "Housing Tenure Choice in Australia and the United States: Impacts of Alternative Subsidy Policies," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 303-328, June.
    7. Patric H. Hendershott & Joel Slemrod, 1982. "Taxes and the User Cost of Capital for Owner-Occupied Housing," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 10(4), pages 375-393.
    8. Rosen, Harvey S., 1979. "Housing decisions and the U.S. income tax : An econometric analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-23, February.
    9. Ermisch, John & Di Salvo, Pamela, 1996. "Surprises and Housing Tenure Decisions in Great Britain," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 247-273, September.
    10. Belzil, Christian, 1995. "Unemployment Insurance and Unemployment over Time: An Analysis with Event History Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 113-126, February.
    11. Lawrence D. Jones, 1989. "Current Wealth and Tenure Choice," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 17(1), pages 17-40.
    12. Gavin Wood & Richard Watson & Paul Flatau, 2006. "Microsimulation Modelling of Tenure Choice and Grants to Promote Home Ownership," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 39(1), pages 14-34, March.
    13. Goodman, John Jr. & Nichols, Joseph B., 1997. "Does FHA Increase Home Ownership or Just Accelerate It?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 184-202, June.
    14. Heckman, James J & Borjas, George J, 1980. "Does Unemployment Cause Future Unemployment? Definitions, Questions and Answers from a Continuous Time Model of Heterogeneity and State Dependence," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 47(187), pages 247-283, August.
    15. Hyunbae Chun & Jeungil Oh, 2002. "An instrumental variable estimate of the effect of fertility on the labour force participation of married women," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(10), pages 631-634.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Plantinga, Andrew J. & Détang-Dessendre, Cécile & Hunt, Gary L. & Piguet, Virginie, 2013. "Housing prices and inter-urban migration," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 296-306.
    2. Garner, Thesia I. & Short, Kathleen, 2009. "Accounting for owner-occupied dwelling services: Aggregates and distributions," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 233-248, September.
    3. Lishan Xiao & Quanyi Qiu & Lijie Gao, 2016. "Chinese Housing Reform and Social Sustainability: Evidence from Post-Reform Home Ownership," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-14, October.
    4. Josep Maria Raya & Aleksander Kucel, 2016. "Did Housing Taxation Contribute to Increase Riskier Borrowing?," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 90-113, July.
    5. Eriksen, Michael D., 2010. "Homeownership subsidies and the marriage decisions of low-income households," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 490-497, November.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:18:y:2009:i:1:p:13-24. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622881 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.