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Groundwater pumping and spatial externalities in agriculture

  • Pfeiffer, Lisa
  • Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

We investigate the behavior of farmers who share an underground aquifer. In the case where seepage may occur the resource is nonexclusive, giving rise to a spatial externality whereby pumping by one user affects others nearby. Theoretically, these externalities are potentially important causes of welfare loss. Using a unique spatial data set of groundwater users in western Kansas, we are able to empirically measure the physical and behavioral effects of groundwater pumping by neighbors. To address the simultaneity of neighbors' pumping, we use the neighbors' permitted water allocation as an instrument for their pumping. We estimate that 2.5% of the total groundwater extracted each year in western Kansas is over-extraction due to the effects of spatial externalities. Individuals who own multiple wells internalize their own externality by trading off pumping at one well for pumping at another.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management.

Volume (Year): 64 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 16-30

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:64:y:2012:i:1:p:16-30
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622870

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  1. Eswaran, Mukesh & Lewis, Tracy R, 1984. "Appropriability and the Extraction of a Common Property Resource," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 51(204), pages 393-400, November.
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  9. Saak, Alexander E. & Peterson, Jeffrey M., 2007. "Groundwater use under incomplete information," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 214-228, September.
  10. Santiago Rubio & Begoña Casino, 2003. "Strategic Behavior and Efficiency in the Common Property Extraction of Groundwater," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(1), pages 73-87, September.
  11. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & Jose A. Scheinkman, 1995. "Crime and Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 5026, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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