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Building out alternative fuel retail infrastructure: Government fleet spillovers in E85

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  • Corts, Kenneth S.

Abstract

One significant obstacle to meeting aggressive federal and state alternative fuel consumption targets is the relative scarcity of retail fueling stations that carry alternative fuels. Policies that encourage or mandate use of alternative fuel vehicles in government fleets, thereby increasing demand for such fuels, are one popular approach to stimulating further development of the alternative fuel retail infrastructure. I focus specifically on flex-fuel vehicles (FFVs) that burn E85, a combination of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline, to study the impact of government fleet composition on retail alternative fuel infrastructure. Using data from six states in the Midwest that account for over 60% of US E85 stations, I show that government fleet adoption of FFVs leads to an increase in retail E85 stations. This finding persists when using instrumental variables techniques to address the endogeneity of government fleet FFV purchases.

Suggested Citation

  • Corts, Kenneth S., 2010. "Building out alternative fuel retail infrastructure: Government fleet spillovers in E85," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 59(3), pages 219-234, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:59:y:2010:i:3:p:219-234
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Huse, Cristian, 2014. "Fast and Furious (and Dirty): How Asymmetric Regulation May Hinder Environmental Policy," MPRA Paper 48909, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Simcoe, Timothy & Toffel, Michael W., 2014. "Government green procurement spillovers: Evidence from municipal building policies in California," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 411-434.
    3. Liao, Kenneth & Pouliot, Sébastien, 2016. "Estimates of the Demand for E85 Using Stated-Preference Data off Revealed-Preference Choices," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236107, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Pouliot, Sébastien & Babcock, Bruce A., 2017. "Feasibility of meeting increased biofuel mandates with E85," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 194-200.
    5. Fabrizio, Kira R. & Hawn, Olga, 2013. "Enabling diffusion: How complementary inputs moderate the response to environmental policy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 1099-1111.
    6. Perdiguero, Jordi & Jiménez, Juan Luis, 2011. "Sell or not sell biodiesel: Local competition and government measures," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 1525-1532, April.
    7. Juliano Assuncao & Joao Paulo Pessoa & Leonardo Rezende, 2013. "Flex Cars and Competition in Ethanol and Gasoline Retail Markets," CEP Discussion Papers dp1251, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    8. Timothy Simcoe & Michael W. Toffel, 2012. "Public Procurement and the Private Supply of Green Buildings," NBER Working Papers 18385, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Gabriel E. Lade & James Bushnell, 2016. "Fuel Subsidy Pass-Through and Market Structure: Evidence from the Renewable Fuel Standard," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 16-wp570, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    10. Du, Xiaodong & Carriquiry, Miguel A., 2013. "Spatiotemporal analysis of ethanol market penetration," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 128-135.
    11. Anderson, Soren T., 2012. "The demand for ethanol as a gasoline substitute," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 151-168.
    12. Salvo, Alberto & Huse, Cristian, 2013. "Build it, but will they come? Evidence from consumer choice between gasoline and sugarcane ethanol," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 251-279.
    13. Gabriel E. Lade & C.Y. Cynthia Lin Lawell & Aaron Smith, 2016. "Policy Shocks and Market-Based Regulations: Evidence from the Renewable Fuel Standard," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 16-wp565, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    14. Kenneth Liao & Sebastien Pouliot & Bruce A. Babcock, 2016. "Estimating Willingness to Pay for E85 in the United States," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 16-wp562, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
    15. repec:eee:enepol:v:109:y:2017:i:c:p:350-359 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Kessler, Jeff & Sperling, Daniel, 2016. "Tracking U.S. biofuel innovation through patents," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 97-107.

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