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Predatory lending practices and subprime foreclosures: Distinguishing impacts by loan category

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  • Rose, Morgan J.

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  • Rose, Morgan J., 2008. "Predatory lending practices and subprime foreclosures: Distinguishing impacts by loan category," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 13-32.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jebusi:v:60:y:2008:i:1-2:p:13-32
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John M. Clapp & Yongheng Deng & Xudong An, 2006. "Unobserved Heterogeneity in Models of Competing Mortgage Termination Risks," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 243-273, June.
    2. Keith D. Harvey & Peter J. Nigro, 2004. "Do Predatory Lending Laws Influence Mortgage Lending? An Analysis of the North Carolina Predatory Lending Law," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 435-456, December.
    3. Yongheng Deng & John M. Quigley & Robert Van Order, 2000. "Mortgage Terminations, Heterogeneity and the Exercise of Mortgage Options," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 275-308, March.
    4. Elliehausen, Gregory & Staten, Michael E. & Steinbuks, Jevgenijs, 2008. "The effect of prepayment penalties on the pricing of subprime mortgages," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 33-46.
    5. Keith D. Harvey & Peter J. Nigro, 2003. "How Do Predatory Lending Laws Influence Mortgage Lending in Urban Areas? A Tale of Two Cities," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 25(4), pages 479-508.
    6. Ho, Giang & Pennington-Cross, Anthony, 2006. "The impact of local predatory lending laws on the flow of subprime credit," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 210-228, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Steinbuks, Jevgenijs, 2015. "Effects of prepayment regulations on termination of subprime mortgages," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 445-456.
    2. O. Emre Ergungor & Stephanie Moulton, 2011. "Beyond the transaction: depository institutions and reduced mortgage default for low-income homebuyers," Working Paper 1115, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Morgan J. Rose, 2011. "Prepayment Penalties: Efficieny and Predation," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 11-133, UMBC Department of Economics.
    4. Elliehausen, Gregory & Staten, Michael E. & Steinbuks, Jevgenijs, 2008. "The effect of prepayment penalties on the pricing of subprime mortgages," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 33-46.
    5. An, Xudong & Deng, Yongheng & Gabriel, Stuart A., 2011. "Asymmetric information, adverse selection, and the pricing of CMBS," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 304-325, May.
    6. Allen C. Goodman & Brent C. Smith, 2010. "Housing default: theory works and so does policy," Working Paper 10-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    7. Lanot, Gauthier & Leece, David, 2010. "The Performance of UK Securitized Subprime Mortgage Debt: ‘Idiosyncratic’ Behaviour or Mortgage Design?," MPRA Paper 27137, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Goodman, Allen C. & Smith, Brent C., 2010. "Residential mortgage default: Theory works and so does policy," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 280-294, December.
    9. Xu, Yilan, 2014. "Does mortgage deregulation increase foreclosures? Evidence from Cleveland," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 126-139.

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