IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jebusi/v54y2002i4p447-462.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Residential investment, macroeconomic activity and financial deregulation in the UK: an empirical investigation

Author

Listed:
  • Hasan, Mohammad S.
  • Taghavi, Majid

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Hasan, Mohammad S. & Taghavi, Majid, 2002. "Residential investment, macroeconomic activity and financial deregulation in the UK: an empirical investigation," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 447-462.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jebusi:v:54:y:2002:i:4:p:447-462
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148-6195(02)00093-0
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carruth, Alan & Henley, Andrew, 1992. "Consumer Durables Spending and Housing Market Activity," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 261-271, August.
    2. Robert J. Gordon, 1977. "World Inflation and Monetary Accommodation in Eight Countries," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 8(2), pages 409-478.
    3. Stanley Fischer, 1981. "Relative Shocks, Relative Price Variability, and Inflation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 12(2), pages 381-442.
    4. Randall Pozdena, 1990. "Do interest rates still affect housing?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Sum, pages 3-14.
    5. Darrat, Ali F, 1988. "On Fiscal Policy and the Stock Market," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 20(3), pages 353-363, August.
    6. David Miles, 1992. "Housing and the Wider Economy in the Short and Long Run," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 139(1), pages 64-78, February.
    7. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Comparison of Interwar and Postwar Business Cycles: Monetarism Reconsidered," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 250-257, May.
    8. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    9. Muellbauer, John & Murphy, Anthony, 1997. "Booms and Busts in the UK Housing Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(445), pages 1701-1727, November.
    10. Lutkepohl, Helmut, 1982. "Non-causality due to omitted variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2-3), pages 367-378, August.
    11. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
    12. McDonald, Ronald & Taylor, Mark P, 1993. "Regional House Prices in Britain: Long-Run Relationships and Short-Run Dynamics," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 40(1), pages 43-55, February.
    13. Engle, R. F. & Granger, C. W. J. (ed.), 1991. "Long-Run Economic Relationships: Readings in Cointegration," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198283393.
    14. Robert J. Gordon & Stephen R. King, 1982. "The Output Cost of Disinflation in Traditional and Vector Autoregressive Models," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 13(1), pages 205-244.
    15. John Ryding, 1990. "Housing finance and the transmission mechanism of monetary policy," Research Paper 9008, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Goodness C. Aye & Stephen M. Miller & Rangan Gupta & Mehmet Balcilar, 2016. "Forecasting US real private residential fixed investment using a large number of predictors," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 1557-1580, December.
    2. Nombulelo Gumata, Alain Kabundi and Eliphas Ndou, 2013. "Important Channels of Transmission Monetary Policy Shock in South Africa," Working Papers 375, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    3. Mohammad S. Hasan, 2009. "Financial Innovations and the Interest Elasticity of Money Demand in the United Kingdom, 1963¡V2009," International Journal of Business and Economics, School of Management Development, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 8(3), pages 225-242, December.
    4. Vargas-Silva, Carlos, 2008. "Monetary policy and the US housing market: A VAR analysis imposing sign restrictions," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 977-990, September.
    5. Engelbert Stockhammer & Christina Wolf, 2019. "Building blocks for the macroeconomics and political economy of housing," Japanese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(1-2), pages 43-67, April.
    6. Naik, Prasad A., 2015. "Marketing Dynamics: A Primer on Estimation and Control," Foundations and Trends(R) in Marketing, now publishers, vol. 9(3), pages 175-266, December.
    7. MeiChi Huang, 2014. "Monetary policy implications of housing shift-contagion across regional markets," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 38(4), pages 589-608, October.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Terrence Kinal & Jonathan Ratner, 1986. "A VAR Forecasting Model of a Regional Economy: Its Construction and Comparative Accuracy," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 10(2), pages 113-126, August.
    2. Pami Dua, 2008. "Analysis of Consumers’ Perceptions of Buying Conditions for Houses," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 335-350, November.
    3. John D. Levendis, 2018. "Time Series Econometrics," Springer Texts in Business and Economics, Springer, number 978-3-319-98282-3, September.
    4. Wilkinson, Katherine J. & Young, Martin R. & Young, Shirley, 2001. "The effects of monetary policy shocks on exchange rates: Evidence from New Zealand and Australia," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 427-455, August.
    5. Man-Keun Kim & Kangil Lee, 2015. "Dynamic Interactions between Carbon and Energy Prices in the U.S. Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(2), pages 494-501.
    6. Jayant Menon, 1993. "Import Price and Activity Elasticities for the MONASH Model: Johansen FIML Estimation of Cointegration Vectors," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers ip-58, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    7. Robert Mulligan & Erwin Nijsse, 2001. "Shortage and currency substitution in transition economies: Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, and Romania," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 7(3), pages 275-295, August.
    8. Athanasenas, Athanasios L., 2010. "Credit, income, and causality: A contemporary co-integration analysis," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 201(1), pages 194-205, February.
    9. Hanan Naser, 2015. "Can Nuclear Energy Stimulates Economic Growth? Evidence from Highly Industrialised Countries," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 164-173.
    10. Zhang, Wei & Yang, Shuyun, 2013. "The influence of energy consumption of China on its real GDP from aggregated and disaggregated viewpoints," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 76-81.
    11. Zhang, Chi & Zhou, Kaile & Yang, Shanlin & Shao, Zhen, 2017. "Exploring the transformation and upgrading of China’s economy using electricity consumption data: A VAR–VEC based model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 473(C), pages 144-155.
    12. Fang, Zheng & Chen, Yang, 2017. "Human capital, energy, and economic development – Evidence from Chinese provincial data," RIEI Working Papers 2017-03, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Research Institute for Economic Integration.
    13. David I. Stern, 2011. "From Correlation to Granger Causality," Crawford School Research Papers 1113, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    14. repec:kap:iaecre:v:7:y:2001:i:3:p:275-295 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Magali Jaoul, 2004. "Enseignement supérieur et marchés du travail. Analyse économétrique de la théorie de l’engorgement," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 166(5), pages 39-57.
    16. Hasan, Mohammad S., 2010. "The long-run relationship between population and per capita income growth in China," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 355-372, May.
    17. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Hassapis, Christis & Pittis, Nikitas, 1998. "Unit roots and long-run causality: investigating the relationship between output, money and interest rates," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 91-112, January.
    18. M. Faizul Islam & Mohammad S. Hasan, 2006. "The Monetary Model of the Dollar-Yen Exchange Rate Determination: A Cointegration Approach," International Journal of Business and Economics, School of Management Development, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 5(2), pages 129-145, August.
    19. De La Cruz Martinez, Justino, 1999. "Mexico's balance of payments and exchange rates: a cointegration analysis," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 401-421.
    20. Andrade, Isabel, 1992. "The relationship between inflation and relative price variability: A multivariate approach," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 9203, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    21. Yıldırım, Ertugrul & Sukruoglu, Deniz & Aslan, Alper, 2014. "Energy consumption and economic growth in the next 11 countries: The bootstrapped autoregressive metric causality approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 14-21.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jebusi:v:54:y:2002:i:4:p:447-462. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-economics-and-business .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Catherine Liu (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-economics-and-business .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.