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Financial Innovations and the Interest Elasticity of Money Demand in the United Kingdom, 1963¡V2009

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  • Mohammad S. Hasan

    (Kent Business School, University of Kent, U.K.)

Abstract

This paper empirically examines the relationship between financial innovations and interest elasticity of money demand in the UK. Contrary to most research work in this area, the results indicate that financial innovations and other deregulatory changes in financial market conditions after the 1980s have raised the interest elasticity of money demand, and this appears to support the Gurley-Shaw hypothesis. The evidence calls into question the relative efficacy of a monetary targeting approach in the conduct of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammad S. Hasan, 2009. "Financial Innovations and the Interest Elasticity of Money Demand in the United Kingdom, 1963¡V2009," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 8(3), pages 225-242, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijb:journl:v:8:y:2009:i:3:p:225-242
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. W. Scott Frame & Lawrence J. White, 2004. "Empirical Studies of Financial Innovation: Lots of Talk, Little Action?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(1), pages 116-144, March.
    2. John Ryding, 1990. "Housing finance and the transmission of monetary policy," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sum, pages 42-55.
    3. Miller, Merton H., 1986. "Financial Innovation: The Last Twenty Years and the Next," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 21(04), pages 459-471, December.
    4. Hendry, David F. & Ericsson, Neil R., 1991. "Modeling the demand for narrow money in the United Kingdom and the United States," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 833-881, May.
    5. Hasan, Mohammad S. & Taghavi, Majid, 2002. "Residential investment, macroeconomic activity and financial deregulation in the UK: an empirical investigation," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 447-462.
    6. Wallace, Myles S & Choudhry, Taufiq, 1995. "The gold standard: Perfectly integrated world markets or slow adjustment of prices and interest rates?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 349-371, June.
    7. John Ryding, 1990. "Housing finance and the transmission mechanism of monetary policy," Research Paper 9008, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    8. Engle, Robert & Granger, Clive, 2015. "Co-integration and error correction: Representation, estimation, and testing," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 39(3), pages 106-135.
    9. Hafer, R W & Hein, Scott E, 1984. "Financial Innovations and the Interest Elasticity of Money Demand: Some Historical Evidence: A Note," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 16(2), pages 247-252, May.
    10. Ben S. Bernanke & Frederic S. Mishkin, 1997. "Inflation Targeting: A New Framework for Monetary Policy?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 97-116, Spring.
    11. Gonzalo, Jesus, 1994. "Five alternative methods of estimating long-run equilibrium relationships," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 203-233.
    12. Stock, James H, 1987. "Asymptotic Properties of Least Squares Estimators of Cointegrating Vectors," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(5), pages 1035-1056, September.
    13. Taylor, Mark P, 1987. "Financial Innovation, Inflation and the Stability of the Demand for Broad Money in the United Kingdom," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3), pages 225-233, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Singh, Sunny Kumar, 2016. "Currency demand stability in the presence of seasonality and endogenous financial innovation: Evidence from India," MPRA Paper 71552, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    interest elasticity; money demand; financial innovations; Gurley-Shaw hypothesis; rolling regressions;

    JEL classification:

    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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