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Threshold transitions in a regional urban system

  • García, Jorge H.
  • Garmestani, Ahjond S.
  • Karunanithi, Arunprakash T.

In this paper we analyze the evolution of city size distributions over time in a regional urban system. This urban complex system is in constant flux with changing groups and city migration across existing and newly created groups. Using group formation as an emergent property, transition probabilities across the different groups were calculated. While short-term transition appears chaotic in the intermediate and lower rank groups, long-term transition across all rank groups reveals striking system structure over time.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 78 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 152-159

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:78:y:2011:i:1:p:152-159
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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  1. Garmestani, Ahjond S. & Allen, Craig R. & Gallagher, Colin M., 2008. "Power laws, discontinuities and regional city size distributions," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 209-216, October.
  2. Duncan Black & Vernon Henderson, 1999. "A Theory of Urban Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(2), pages 252-284, April.
  3. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-99, June.
  4. Brock, W.A., 1995. "A Rational Route to Randomness," Working papers 9530, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  5. Sukkoo Kim & Robert A. Margo, 2003. "Historical Perspectives on U.S. Economic Geography," NBER Working Papers 9594, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Paul Krugman, 1991. "Cities in Space: Three Simple Models," NBER Working Papers 3607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Stuart S. Rosenthal & William C. Strange, 1999. "Geography, Industrial Organization, and Agglomeration," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 14, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  8. Duncan Black & Vernon Henderson, 2003. "Urban evolution in the USA," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(4), pages 343-372, October.
  9. Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 2005. "Frontiers of the New Economic Geography," IDE Discussion Papers 27, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
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