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In broad daylight: Fuller information and higher-order punishment opportunities can promote cooperation

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  • Kamei, Kenju
  • Putterman, Louis

Abstract

The expectation that non-cooperators will be punished can help to sustain cooperation, but there are competing claims about whether opportunities to engage in higher-order punishment (punishing punishment or failure to punish) help or undermine cooperation in social dilemmas. Varying treatments of a voluntary contribution experiment, we find that availability of higher-order punishment opportunities increases cooperation and efficiency when subjects have full information on the pattern of punishing and its history, when any subject can punish any other, and when the numbers of punishment and of contribution stages are not too unequal.

Suggested Citation

  • Kamei, Kenju & Putterman, Louis, 2015. "In broad daylight: Fuller information and higher-order punishment opportunities can promote cooperation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 145-159.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:120:y:2015:i:c:p:145-159
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2015.09.020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nicklisch, Andreas & Grechenig, Kristoffel & Thöni, Christian, 2016. "Information-sensitive Leviathans," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 1-13.
    2. Fu, Tingting & Ji, Yunan & Kamei, Kenju & Putterman, Louis, 2017. "Punishment can support cooperation even when punishable," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 84-87.
    3. Kamei, Kenju, 2018. "Group Size Effect and Over-Punishment in the Case of Third Party Enforcement of Social Norms," MPRA Paper 85713, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Kamei, Kenju, 2017. "Altruistic Norm Enforcement and Decision-Making Format in a Dilemma: Experimental Evidence," MPRA Paper 76641, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Müller, Julia & Schwieren, Christiane & Spitzer, Florian, 2016. "What Drives Destruction? On the Malleability of Anti-Social Behavior," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 5343, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    6. Daniel A. DeCaro & Marco A. Janssen & Allen Lee, 2015. "Synergistic effects of voting and enforcement on internalized motivation to cooperate in a resource dilemma," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 10(6), pages 511-537, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social dilemma; Voluntary contribution; Public goods; Punishment; Counter-punishment; Higher-order punishment;

    JEL classification:

    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • D0 - Microeconomics - - General

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