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Being kind to ourselves: Self-compassion, coping, and consumption

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  • Karanika, Katerina
  • Hogg, Margaret K.

Abstract

Most consumer research on coping builds from the notion of pursuing self-esteem. However, recent psychological research emphasizes the pursuit of self-compassion as a healthier goal versus the pursuit of self-esteem within coping strategies. Only a minority of consumer research studies discuss self-compassion in relation to coping. Yet, these more recent consumer studies firstly, do not explore the different coping strategies linked to self-compassion even though psychological research suggests that self-compassion involves different components. Secondly, these recent consumer studies do not explore the role of socio-temporal comparisons in self-compassionate coping even though psychological research relates socio-temporal comparisons to self-compassion. This phenomenological study of downwardly mobile consumers identifies different coping strategies that reflect a pursuit of self-compassion and highlights how coping strategies, with a focus on self-compassion, relate to socio-temporal comparisons. The study contrasts and maps consumers' coping strategies in their pursuit of self-esteem and self-compassion. The study contributes to an understanding of consumer coping.

Suggested Citation

  • Karanika, Katerina & Hogg, Margaret K., 2016. "Being kind to ourselves: Self-compassion, coping, and consumption," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 760-769.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:69:y:2016:i:2:p:760-769
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.042
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    Cited by:

    1. Celsi, Mary Wolfinbarger & Nelson, Russel P. & Dellande, Stephanie & Gilly, Mary C., 2017. "Temptation's itch: Mindlessness, acceptance, and mindfulness in a debt management program," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 81-94.
    2. Loureiro, Sandra Maria Correia & de Plaza, Maria Alejandra Pinero & Taghian, Mehdi, 2020. "The effect of benign and malicious envies on desire to buy luxury fashion items," Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    3. Dahana, Wirawan Dony & Miwa, Yukihiro & Morisada, Makoto, 2019. "Linking lifestyle to customer lifetime value: An exploratory study in an online fashion retail market," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 319-331.

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