IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Effects of social influence on consumers' voluntary adoption of innovations prompted by others


  • Kim, Sang-Hoon
  • Park, Hyun Jung


Research on innovation adoption focuses on voluntary adoption, although non-voluntary or prompted adoption decisions are prevalent in real life, especially for high-tech products and services. This study aims to investigate the effect of social influence on consumers' innovation adoption in the context of prompted adoption. In particular, the present paper models the duration of voluntary adoption as a function of social norms, attractiveness of the prompter, number of prompters, and so on. Prior knowledge is not only a control variable, but also a moderating variable for a few social factors. This paper validates models relying on the illustrative application of a mobile gift service called Gifticon. The results provide much insight for marketing practitioners on how to accelerate consumers' adoption behavior and therefore the diffusion of innovative products.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Sang-Hoon & Park, Hyun Jung, 2011. "Effects of social influence on consumers' voluntary adoption of innovations prompted by others," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(11), pages 1190-1194.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:64:y:2011:i:11:p:1190-1194
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2011.06.021

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fred D. Davis & Richard P. Bagozzi & Paul R. Warshaw, 1989. "User Acceptance of Computer Technology: A Comparison of Two Theoretical Models," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 35(8), pages 982-1003, August.
    2. McCracken, Grant, 1989. " Who Is the Celebrity Endorser? Cultural Foundations of the Endorsement Process," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 310-321, December.
    3. Randolph B. Cooper & Robert W. Zmud, 1990. "Information Technology Implementation Research: A Technological Diffusion Approach," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 36(2), pages 123-139, February.
    4. Kulviwat, Songpol & Bruner II, Gordon C. & Al-Shuridah, Obaid, 2009. "The role of social influence on adoption of high tech innovations: The moderating effect of public/private consumption," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(7), pages 706-712, July.
    5. David Godes & Dina Mayzlin, 2004. "Using Online Conversations to Study Word-of-Mouth Communication," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 23(4), pages 545-560, June.
    6. Viswanath Venkatesh & Fred D. Davis, 2000. "A Theoretical Extension of the Technology Acceptance Model: Four Longitudinal Field Studies," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 46(2), pages 186-204, February.
    7. Bearden, William O & Etzel, Michael J, 1982. " Reference Group Influence on Product and Brand Purchase Decisions," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(2), pages 183-194, September.
    8. Park, C Whan & Lessig, V Parker, 1977. " Students and Housewives: Differences in Susceptibility to Reference Group Influence," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 102-110, Se.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:infosf:v:17:y:2015:i:5:d:10.1007_s10796-014-9484-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:jbrese:v:82:y:2018:i:c:p:179-191 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Al-Qeisi, Kholoud & Dennis, Charles & Alamanos, Eleftherios & Jayawardhena, Chanaka, 2014. "Website design quality and usage behavior: Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(11), pages 2282-2290.
    4. Daniel Kyalo Willy & Arnim Kuhn, 2016. "Technology Adoption Under Variable Weather Conditions — The Case of Rain Water Harvesting in Lake Naivasha Basin, Kenya," Water Economics and Policy (WEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 2(02), pages 1-25, June.
    5. Chatterjee, Pabitra & Chollet, Barthélemy & Trendel, Olivier, 2017. "From conformity to reactance: Contingent role of network centrality in consumer-to-consumer influence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 86-94.
    6. Willy, Daniel Kyalo & Holm-Müller, Karin, 2013. "Social influence and collective action effects on farm level soil conservation effort in rural Kenya," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 94-103.
    7. Leïla Elgaaied-Gambier & Elisa Monnot & Fanny Reniou, 2018. "Using descriptive norm appeals effectively to promote green behavior," Post-Print hal-01630909, HAL.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:64:y:2011:i:11:p:1190-1194. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.