IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jbrese/v63y2010i7p673-681.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Adapting to a retail environment: Modeling consumer-environment interactions

Author

Listed:
  • Massara, Francesco
  • Liu, Sandra S.
  • Melara, Robert D.

Abstract

This paper extends current thinking on the relationship between consumers and the retail environment by assessing a theory of consumer-environment interaction that reinterprets arousal and dominance, two dimensions of the PAD model (Mehrabian, Albert, Russel, James A., An approach to environmental psychology. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1974.), as appraisal dimensions (affective expectations). According to the new account, the more specific the task, the less tolerant consumers are about discrepancies between expected and experienced arousal and dominance. The study evaluated the effects of matching or mismatching appraisals on judgments of emotional dimensions as participants shopped within a virtual store environment. Appraisals were manipulated by combining two goal conditions (goal specificity vs. goal ambiguity) with two levels of store arousal (high vs. low) to produce four separate hypothetical states: hedonic fit (ambiguous goal and high arousal), utilitarian fit (specific goal and low arousal), rational control (ambiguous goal and low arousal), and emotional submissiveness (specific goal and high arousal). When perceptual and cognitive appraisals matched (i.e., hedonic or utilitarian fit), participants judged pleasure to be significantly greater than when expectations mismatched (i.e., rational control or emotional submissiveness). Affective expectations concerning arousal and dominance thus are a strong determinant of consumer predisposition toward the environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Massara, Francesco & Liu, Sandra S. & Melara, Robert D., 2010. "Adapting to a retail environment: Modeling consumer-environment interactions," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 673-681, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:7:p:673-681
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148-2963(09)00142-8
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kathleen D. Vohs & Ronald J. Faber, 2007. "Spent Resources: Self-Regulatory Resource Availability Affects Impulse Buying," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(4), pages 537-547, January.
    2. Machleit, Karen A. & Eroglu, Sevgin A., 2000. "Describing and Measuring Emotional Response to Shopping Experience," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 101-111, August.
    3. Walters, Rockney G. & Jamil, Maqbul, 2003. "Exploring the relationships between shopping trip type, purchases of products on promotion, and shopping basket profit," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 17-29, January.
    4. Chebat, Jean-Charles & Chebat, Claire Gelinas & Vaillant, Dominique, 2001. "Environmental background music and in-store selling," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 115-123, November.
    5. Chebat, Jean-Charles & Robicheaux, Robert A., 2003. "Advances in consumer decision processes in retail environments: Introduction to the Special Issue on Retailing Research," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(7), pages 503-504, July.
    6. Burke, Raymond R, et al, 1992. " Comparing Dynamic Consumer Choice in Real and Computer-Simulated Environments," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 71-82, June.
    7. Hui, Michael K & Bateson, John E G, 1991. " Perceived Control and the Effects of Crowding and Consumer Choice on the Service Experience," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(2), pages 174-184, September.
    8. Turley, L. W. & Milliman, Ronald E., 2000. "Atmospheric Effects on Shopping Behavior: A Review of the Experimental Evidence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 193-211, August.
    9. Babin, Barry J. & Hardesty, David M. & Suter, Tracy A., 2003. "Color and shopping intentions: The intervening effect of price fairness and perceived affect," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(7), pages 541-551, July.
    10. Bateson, John E G & Hui, Michael K, 1992. " The Ecological Validity of Photographic Slides and Videotapes in Simulating the Service Setting," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(2), pages 271-281, September.
    11. Ward, James C. & Barnes, John W., 2001. "Control and affect: the influence of feeling in control of the retail environment on affect, involvement, attitude, and behavior," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 139-144, November.
    12. Michon, Richard & Chebat, Jean-Charles & Turley, L. W., 2005. "Mall atmospherics: the interaction effects of the mall environment on shopping behavior," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(5), pages 576-583, May.
    13. Havlena, William J & Holbrook, Morris B, 1986. " The Varieties of Consumption Experience: Comparing Two Typologies of Emotion in Consumer Behavior," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 394-404, December.
    14. Rook, Dennis W, 1987. " The Buying Impulse," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 189-199, September.
    15. Alba, Joseph W & Hutchinson, J Wesley, 1987. " Dimensions of Consumer Expertise," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(4), pages 411-454, March.
    16. Holbrook, Morris B & Batra, Rajeev, 1987. " Assessing the Role of Emotions as Mediators of Consumer Responses to Advertising," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(3), pages 404-420, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Garaus, Marion & Wagner, Udo, 2016. "Retail shopper confusion: Conceptualization, scale development, and consequences," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 3459-3467.
    2. Beatriz Cavalcante Chamie & Ana Akemi Ikeda, 2015. "The Value for the Consumer in Retail," Brazilian Business Review, Fucape Business School, vol. 12(2), pages 46-65, March.
    3. Garaus, Marion & Wagner, Udo & Kummer, Claudia, 2015. "Cognitive fit, retail shopper confusion, and shopping value: Empirical investigation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1003-1011.
    4. Hanks, Andrew S. & Just, David R. & Wansink, Brian, 2012. "Trigger Foods: The Influence of “Irrelevant†Alternatives in School Lunchrooms," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 41(1), April.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:63:y:2010:i:7:p:673-681. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusres .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.