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Should I stay or should I go? Mood congruity, self-monitoring and retail context preference

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  • Puccinelli, Nancy M.
  • Deshpande, Rohit
  • Isen, Alice M.

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  • Puccinelli, Nancy M. & Deshpande, Rohit & Isen, Alice M., 2007. "Should I stay or should I go? Mood congruity, self-monitoring and retail context preference," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 60(6), pages 640-648, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:60:y:2007:i:6:p:640-648
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jennifer J. Argo & Darren W. Dahl & Rajesh V. Manchanda, 2005. "The Influence of a Mere Social Presence in a Retail Context," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(2), pages 207-212, September.
    2. Sharma, Arun & Stafford, Thomas F., 2000. "The Effect of Retail Atmospherics on Customers' Perceptions of Salespeople and Customer Persuasion:: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 183-191, August.
    3. Adaval, Rashmi, 2001. " Sometimes It Just Feels Right: The Differential Weighting of Affect-Consistent and Affect-Inconsistent Product Information," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(1), pages 1-17, June.
    4. Mandel, Naomi & Johnson, Eric J, 2002. " When Web Pages Influence Choice: Effects of Visual Primes on Experts and Novices," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(2), pages 235-245, September.
    5. Turley, L. W. & Milliman, Ronald E., 2000. "Atmospheric Effects on Shopping Behavior: A Review of the Experimental Evidence," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 193-211, August.
    6. Babin, Barry J. & Hardesty, David M. & Suter, Tracy A., 2003. "Color and shopping intentions: The intervening effect of price fairness and perceived affect," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 56(7), pages 541-551, July.
    7. Darden, William R. & Babin, Barry J., 1994. "Exploring the concept of affective quality: Expanding the concept of retail personality," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 101-109, February.
    8. Ratner, Rebecca K & Kahn, Barbara E, 2002. " The Impact of Private versus Public Consumption on Variety-Seeking Behavior," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(2), pages 246-257, September.
    9. Stayman, Douglas M & Deshpande, Rohit, 1989. " Situational Ethnicity and Consumer Behavior," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 361-371, December.
    10. Babin, Barry J. & Darden, William R., 1996. "Good and bad shopping vibes: Spending and patronage satisfaction," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 201-206, March.
    11. Arnold, Mark J. & Reynolds, Kristy E. & Ponder, Nicole & Lueg, Jason E., 2005. "Customer delight in a retail context: investigating delightful and terrible shopping experiences," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(8), pages 1132-1145, August.
    12. Swinyard, William R, 1993. " The Effects of Mood, Involvement, and Quality of Store Experience on Shopping Intentions," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 271-280, September.
    13. Babin, Barry J. & Attaway, Jill S., 2000. "Atmospheric Affect as a Tool for Creating Value and Gaining Share of Customer," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 91-99, August.
    14. Sirgy, M. Joseph & Grewal, Dhruv & Mangleburg, Tamara, 2000. "Retail Environment, Self-Congruity, and Retail Patronage: An Integrative Model and a Research Agenda," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 127-138, August.
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    1. repec:eee:tefoso:v:124:y:2017:i:c:p:228-242 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:joreco:v:31:y:2016:i:c:p:199-206 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Knewtson, Heather S. & Sias, Richard W., 2010. "Why Susie owns Starbucks: The name letter effect in security selection," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 63(12), pages 1324-1327, December.

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