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A signaling theory of nonmonetary sanctions

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  • D’Antoni, Massimo
  • Galbiati, Roberto

Abstract

It is a widely accepted conclusion of the economic literature on optimal law enforcement that nonmonetary sanctions should be introduced only when fines have been used up to their maximum extent. In this paper it is shown that when the sanctioning policy conveys information about the harmfulness of the sanctioned behavior, the use of nonmonetary sanctions can be optimal even when the monetary fine is not maximal. The argument is formalized in a model with rational but uninformed individuals, who know that the enforcer has better information about the harmfulness of actions but are uncertain about the true objectives of the enforcer.

Suggested Citation

  • D’Antoni, Massimo & Galbiati, Roberto, 2007. "A signaling theory of nonmonetary sanctions," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 204-218.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:irlaec:v:27:y:2007:i:2:p:204-218
    DOI: 10.1016/j.irle.2007.06.008
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    Cited by:

    1. Pedro Barros & Joseph Clougherty & Jo Seldeslachts, 2010. "How to Measure the Deterrence Effects of Merger Policy: Frequency or Composition?," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 1-8.
    2. Yulia (Paramonova) Kuchumova, 2017. "A Collateral Tax Sanction: When Does it Mimic a Welfare-Improving Tag?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 181/EC/2017, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Rizzolli, Matteo & Tremewan, James, 2018. "Hard labor in the lab: Deterrence, non-monetary sanctions, and severe procedures," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 107-121.
    4. Yulia Kuchumova, 2018. "A collateral tax sanction: When does it mimic a welfare-improving tag?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 25(4), pages 841-866, August.
    5. Basili, Marcello & Belloc, Filippo & Nicita, Antonio, 2015. "Group attitude and hybrid sanctions: Micro-econometric evidence from traffic law," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 325-336.
    6. Éric Langlais, 2010. "Les criminels aiment-ils le risque ?," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 61(2), pages 263-280.
    7. Matteo Rizzolli & James Tremewan, 2016. "Hard Labour in the lab: Are monetary and non-monetary sanctions really substitutable?," Vienna Economics Papers 1606, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    8. Daniel Villatoro & Giulia Andrighetto & Rosaria Conte & Jordi Sabater-Mir, 2015. "Self-Policing Through Norm Internalization: A Cognitive Solution to the Tragedy of the Digital Commons in Social Networks," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 18(2), pages 1-2.
    9. Laure de Batz, 2018. "Financial Impact of Regulatory Sanctions on French Listed Companies," Working Papers IES 2018/10, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Apr 2018.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Optimal deterrence; Nonmonetary sanctions;

    JEL classification:

    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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