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Increasing productivity in global firms: The CEO challenge


  • Mefford, Robert N.


In a highly competitive environment global firms face the challenge of increasing productivity to compete with firms sourcing production in low-wage developing countries. This paper presents a new paradigm of production which provides a solution to the productivity challenge. The new paradigm is both a philosophy of management and a set of methods that draw upon the experiences of firms employing quality management and lean production. This approach has proven to yield substantial gains in quality, productivity, and competitiveness. The methods and the requirements to successfully implement it are discussed. How to transplant these systems to developing countries is also considered. The role of the CEO in successful implementation of the New Productivity Paradigm is discussed in the final section.

Suggested Citation

  • Mefford, Robert N., 2009. "Increasing productivity in global firms: The CEO challenge," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 262-272, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:intman:v:15:y:2009:i:3:p:262-272

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dale W. Jorgenson & Mun S. Ho & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2008. "A Retrospective Look at the U.S. Productivity Growth Resurgence," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
    2. Baumol William J. & Litan Robert E & Schramm Carl J, 2007. "Sustaining Entrepreneurial Capitalism," Capitalism and Society, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-38, November.
    3. Feldstein, Martin, 2008. "Did wages reflect growth in productivity?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 591-594.
    4. Martin N. Baily, 2004. "Recent productivity growth: the role of information technology and other innovations," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 35-42.
    5. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: U.S. Economic Growth in the Information Age," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(1), pages 125-236.
    6. Feldstein, Martin, 2008. "Did Wages Reflect Growth in Productivity?," Scholarly Articles 2794832, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. Robert N. Mefford, 2006. "Applying information technology in global supply chains: cultural and ethical challenges," International Journal of Integrated Supply Management, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(3), pages 170-188.
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    Cited by:

    1. Onkelinx, Jonas & Manolova, Tatiana S. & Edelman, Linda F., 2016. "The human factor: Investments in employee human capital, productivity, and SME internationalization," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 351-364.


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