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What does learning for all mean for DFID's global education work?

Author

Listed:
  • Berry, Christopher
  • Barnett, Edward
  • Hinton, Rachel

Abstract

The MDGs incentivised a focus on education access over quality. For post-2015, a compelling goal on learning for all will be critical to address the global ‘learning crisis’. This poses challenges both with respect to getting global agreement on learning metrics and finding ways to reliably measure learning over time. Furthermore, in order to accelerate progress on learning, robust evidence of what works will need to be generated and more effectively used in programming and policy making. The paper concludes with some reflections on the difficult politics for donors of engaging on a learning agenda post-2015.

Suggested Citation

  • Berry, Christopher & Barnett, Edward & Hinton, Rachel, 2015. "What does learning for all mean for DFID's global education work?," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 323-329.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:injoed:v:40:y:2015:i:c:p:323-329
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ijedudev.2014.11.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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