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The contribution of economic fundamentals to movements in exchange rates

Listed author(s):
  • Balke, Nathan S.
  • Ma, Jun
  • Wohar, Mark E.

Starting from the asset pricing approach of Engel and West, we examine the degree to which fundamentals can explain exchange rate fluctuations. We show that it is not possible to obtain sharp inferences about the relative contribution of fundamentals using only data on observed monetary fundamentals—money minus output differentials across countries—and exchange rates. We use additional data on interest rate and price differentials along with the implications of the monetary model of exchange rates to decompose exchange rate fluctuations. In general, we find that money demand shifts, along with observed monetary fundamentals, are an important contributor to exchange rate fluctuations.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022199612001675
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of International Economics.

Volume (Year): 90 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 1-16

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Handle: RePEc:eee:inecon:v:90:y:2013:i:1:p:1-16
DOI: 10.1016/j.jinteco.2012.10.003
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505552

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  7. Rime, Dagfinn & Sarno, Lucio & Sojli, Elvira, 2010. "Exchange rate forecasting, order flow and macroeconomic information," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 72-88, January.
  8. James M. Nason & John H. Rogers, 2008. "Exchange rates and fundamentals: a generalization," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2008-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  9. Cerra, Valerie & Saxena, Sweta Chaman, 2010. "The monetary model strikes back: Evidence from the world," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 184-196, July.
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  16. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Chinn, Menzie D. & Pascual, Antonio Garcia, 2005. "Empirical exchange rate models of the nineties: Are any fit to survive?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(7), pages 1150-1175, November.
  17. Engel, Charles, 1996. "The forward discount anomaly and the risk premium: A survey of recent evidence," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 123-192, June.
  18. Meese, Richard A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1983. "Empirical exchange rate models of the seventies : Do they fit out of sample?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1-2), pages 3-24, February.
  19. Mark, Nelson C. & Sul, Donggyu, 2001. "Nominal exchange rates and monetary fundamentals: Evidence from a small post-Bretton woods panel," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 29-52, February.
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  21. Engel, Charles & West, Kenneth D., 2006. "Taylor Rules and the Deutschmark: Dollar Real Exchange Rate," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(5), pages 1175-1194, August.
  22. Lucio Sarno & Elvira Sojli, 2009. "The Feeble Link between Exchange Rates and Fundamentals: Can We Blame the Discount Factor?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 41(2-3), pages 437-442, March.
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