IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/iepoli/v40y2017icp71-79.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Infrastructure deficiencies and adoption of mobile money in Sub-Saharan Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Mothobi, Onkokame
  • Grzybowski, Lukasz

Abstract

We use survey data conducted in 11 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa in 2011 to analyze how the availability of physical infrastructure influences adoption of mobile phones and usage of mobile services. The availability of physical service infrastructure is approximated by data on nighttime light intensity in the areas in which survey respondents reside. After controlling for a number of individual and household characteristics including disposable income, we find that adoption of mobile phones is higher in areas with better physical infrastructure. However, mobile phone users who live in areas with poor infrastructure are more likely to rely on mobile phones to make financial transactions than individuals living in areas with better infrastructure. On the other hand, the use of mobile phones to access services such as email, skype, social media networks and Internet browsing is not dependent on the availability of physical infrastructure. Our results support the notion that mobile phones improve the livelihood of individuals residing in remote areas by providing them with access to financial services which are otherwise not available physically.

Suggested Citation

  • Mothobi, Onkokame & Grzybowski, Lukasz, 2017. "Infrastructure deficiencies and adoption of mobile money in Sub-Saharan Africa," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 71-79.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:iepoli:v:40:y:2017:i:c:p:71-79
    DOI: 10.1016/j.infoecopol.2017.05.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167624516301342
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Isaac Mbiti & David N. Weil, 2015. "Mobile Banking: The Impact of M-Pesa in Kenya," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 247-293 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Birke, Daniel & Swann, G.M. Peter, 2010. "Network effects, network structure and consumer interaction in mobile telecommunications in Europe and Asia," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 153-167, November.
    3. Vernon Henderson & Adam Storeygard & David N. Weil, 2011. "A Bright Idea for Measuring Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 194-199, May.
    4. Megumi Muto, 2012. "The Impacts of Mobile Phones and Personal Networks on Rural-to-Urban Migration: Evidence from Uganda," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(5), pages -807, November.
    5. Klonner, Stefan & Nolen, Patrick J., 2010. "Cell Phones and Rural Labor Markets: Evidence from South Africa," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 56, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    6. Robert Jensen, 2007. "The Digital Provide: Information (Technology), Market Performance, and Welfare in the South Indian Fisheries Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 879-924.
    7. Lukasz Grzybowski, 2015. "The role of network effects and consumer heterogeneity in adoption of mobile phones: evidence from South Africa," Working Papers 522, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    8. Gutierrez, Eva & Singh, Sandeep, 2013. "What regulatory frameworks are more conducive to mobile banking ? empirical evidence from findex data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6652, The World Bank.
    9. Nicholas Economides & Przemyslaw Jeziorski, 2014. "Mobile Money in Tanzania," Working Papers 14-24, NET Institute.
    10. Jenny C. Aker & Isaac M. Mbiti, 2010. "Mobile Phones and Economic Development in Africa," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 207-232, Summer.
    11. Muto, Megumi & Yamano, Takashi, 2009. "The Impact of Mobile Phone Coverage Expansion on Market Participation: Panel Data Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 1887-1896, December.
    12. Harald Gruber & Pantelis Koutroumpis, 2011. "Mobile telecommunications and the impact on economic development," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 26(67), pages 387-426, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mobile money; M-Pesa; Sub-Saharan Africa; Nighttime light data;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • L96 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Telecommunications

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:iepoli:v:40:y:2017:i:c:p:71-79. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu) or (). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505549 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.