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The impact of IT investment on income and wealth inequality in the postwar US economy

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  • Wolff, Edward N.

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  • Wolff, Edward N., 2002. "The impact of IT investment on income and wealth inequality in the postwar US economy," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 233-251, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:iepoli:v:14:y:2002:i:2:p:233-251
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Allen, Steven G, 2001. "Technology and the Wage Structure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(2), pages 440-483, April.
    2. Alan B. Krueger, 1993. "How Computers Have Changed the Wage Structure: Evidence from Microdata, 1984–1989," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(1), pages 33-60.
    3. Eli Berman & John Bound & Zvi Griliches, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U. S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-397.
    4. Levy, Frank & Murnane, Richard J, 1992. "U.S. Earnings Levels and Earnings Inequality: A Review of Recent Trends and Proposed Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 1333-1381, September.
    5. Eli Bekman & John Bound & Stephen Machin, 1998. "Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1245-1279.
    6. David R. Howell, "undated". "Institutional Failure and the American Worker, The Collapse of Low-Skill Wages," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_29, Levy Economics Institute.
    7. John E. DiNardo & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303.
    8. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
    9. James D. Adams, 1997. "Technology, Trade, and Wages," NBER Working Papers 5940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Julian R. Betts, 1997. "The Skill Bias Of Technological Change In Canadian Manufacturing Industries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 146-150, February.
    11. Bresnahan, Timothy F, 1999. "Computerisation and Wage Dispersion: An Analytical Reinterpretation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(456), pages 390-415, June.
    12. David S. Lee, 1999. "Wage Inequality in the United States During the 1980s: Rising Dispersion or Falling Minimum Wage?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(3), pages 977-1023.
    13. Gary Burtless, 1995. "International Trade and the Rise in Earnings Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 800-816, June.
    14. Jacob Mincer, 1991. "Human Capital, Technology, and the Wage Structure: What Do Time Series Show?," NBER Working Papers 3581, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Bound, John & Johnson, George, 1992. "Changes in the Structure of Wages in the 1980's: An Evaluation of Alternative Explanations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 371-392, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Márquez Ramos, Laura & Martínez Zarzoso, Inmaculada & Sanjuan Lucas, Elena & Suárez Burguet, Celestino, 2007. "Efecto De Las TIC Sobre El Comercio Y El Desarrollo Económico. Análisis Para El Caso De España/Effect of ICT on Trade and Economic Development. An Application to the Spanish Case," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 25, pages 313-340, Abril.
    2. Heshmati, Almas, 2004. "Growth, Inequality and Poverty Relationships," IZA Discussion Papers 1338, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Baltagi, Badi H. & Rich, Daniel P., 2005. "Skill-biased technical change in US manufacturing: a general index approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 126(2), pages 549-570, June.
    4. Sang-Chul Yoon, 2011. "Technology Adoption and Skill Premium in the Knowledge Economy," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 27, pages 231-251.

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