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Extreme equilibria in the negotiation model with different time preferences

  • Houba, Harold
  • Wen, Quan

We study a negotiation model with a disagreement game between offers and counteroffers. When players have different time preferences, delay can be Pareto efficient, thereby violates the presumption of the Hicks Paradox. We show that all equilibria are characterized by the extreme equilibria. Making unacceptable offers supports extreme equilibria, and significantly alters the backward-induction technique to find the extreme equilibrium payoffs. A playerʼs worst equilibrium payoff is characterized by a minmax problem involving efficient equilibrium payoffs that are above the bargaining frontier, which is possible when players have sufficiently different time preferences.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Games and Economic Behavior.

Volume (Year): 73 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 507-516

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Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:73:y:2011:i:2:p:507-516
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622836

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