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Valuation of First Nations peoples' social, cultural, and land use activities using life satisfaction approach

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  • Kant, Shashi
  • Vertinsky, Ilan
  • Zheng, Bin

Abstract

Social, Cultural, and Land Use (SCLU) activities of First Nations peoples of Canada are valued using a two-layer multi-domain – Financial, Health, Housing, and SCLU – model of life satisfaction. The model was estimated using primary data and 2SLS and 3SLS·The SCLU domain contributed more than twice than the Financial domain to general satisfaction (GS). SCLU activities, such as trapping days, gathering days, traditional diets, quality of time spent on gathering and trapping, and satisfaction with land laws made significant contributions to GS. In terms of elasticities, the quality of time spent on gathering was the most important contributing factor.

Suggested Citation

  • Kant, Shashi & Vertinsky, Ilan & Zheng, Bin, 2016. "Valuation of First Nations peoples' social, cultural, and land use activities using life satisfaction approach," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 46-55.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:72:y:2016:i:c:p:46-55
    DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2016.06.014
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    1. Vujcic, Maja & Tomicevic-Dubljevic, Jelena, 2018. "Urban forest benefits to the younger population: The case study of the city of Belgrade, Serbia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 54-62.
    2. Roos, Anders & Eggers, Jeannette & Mark-Herbert, Cecilia & Lindhagen, Anders, 2018. "Using von Thünen rings and service-dominant logic in balancing forest ecosystem services," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 622-632.
    3. Valatin, Gregory & Moseley, Darren & Dandy, Norman, 2016. "Insights from behavioural economics for forest economics and environmental policy: Potential nudges to encourage woodland creation for climate change mitigation and adaptation?," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 27-36.

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