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Transfer of information by an informed trader

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  • Dev, Pritha

Abstract

This paper analyzes the effect of the transfer of information by an informed strategic trader (owner) to another strategic player (buyer). It shows that while the owner will never fully divulge his information, he may transfer a noisy signal of his information to the buyer. With such a transfer, the owner loses some of his informational superiority and yet increases his trading profit. I also show that if the transfer can be made to more than one buyer, then, the owner’s profit is increasing in the number of other buyers to whom the transfer is made.

Suggested Citation

  • Dev, Pritha, 2013. "Transfer of information by an informed trader," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 58-71.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:finlet:v:10:y:2013:i:2:p:58-71
    DOI: 10.1016/j.frl.2013.01.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Admati, Anat R & Pfleiderer, Paul, 1988. "Selling and Trading on Information in Financial Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 96-103, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Yongjie & An, Yahui & Feng, Xu & Jin, Xi, 2017. "Celebrities and ordinaries in social networks: Who knows more information?," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 153-161.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Market microstructure; Transfer of information;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design

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