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Building synergies between climate change mitigation and energy poverty alleviation

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  • Ürge-Vorsatz, Diana
  • Tirado Herrero, Sergio

Abstract

Even though energy poverty alleviation and climate change mitigation are inextricably linked policy goals, they have remained as relatively disconnected fields of research inquiry and policy development. Acknowledging this gap, this paper explores the mainstream academic and policy literatures to provide a taxonomy of interactions and identify synergies and trade-offs between them. The most important trade-off identified is the potential increase in energy poverty levels as a result of strong climate change action if the internalisation of the external costs of carbon emissions is not offset by efficiency gains. The most significant synergy was found in deep energy efficiency in buildings. The paper argues that neither of the two problems – deep reductions in GHG emissions by mid-century, and energy poverty eradication – is likely to be solved fully on their own merit, while joining the two policy goals may provide a very solid case for deep efficiency improvements. Thus, the paper calls for a strong integration of these two policy goals (plus other key related benefits like energy security or employment), in order to provide sufficient policy motivation to mobilise a wide-scale implementation of deep energy efficiency standards.

Suggested Citation

  • Ürge-Vorsatz, Diana & Tirado Herrero, Sergio, 2012. "Building synergies between climate change mitigation and energy poverty alleviation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 83-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:49:y:2012:i:c:p:83-90
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2011.11.093
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:enepol:v:110:y:2017:i:c:p:404-409 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Vilches, Alberto & Barrios Padura, Ángela & Molina Huelva, Marta, 2017. "Retrofitting of homes for people in fuel poverty: Approach based on household thermal comfort," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 283-291.
    3. Ürge-Vorsatz, Diana & Kelemen, Agnes & Tirado-Herrero, Sergio & Thomas, Stefan & Thema, Johannes & Mzavanadze, Nora & Hauptstock, Dorothea & Suerkemper, Felix & Teubler, Jens & Gupta, Mukesh & Chatter, 2016. "Measuring multiple impacts of low-carbon energy options in a green economy context," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 179(C), pages 1409-1426.
    4. Andrew Reeves, 2016. "Exploring Local and Community Capacity to Reduce Fuel Poverty: The Case of Home Energy Advice Visits in the UK," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(4), pages 1-17, April.
    5. Hallegatte, Stephane & Bangalore, Mook & Bonzanigo, Laura & Fay, Marianne & Narloch, Ulf & Rozenberg, Julie & Vogt-Schilb, Adrien, 2014. "Climate change and poverty -- an analytical framework," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7126, The World Bank.
    6. Peter Heindl, 2015. "Measuring Fuel Poverty: General Considerations and Application to German Household Data," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 71(2), pages 178-215, June.
    7. Henneman, Lucas R.F. & Rafaj, Peter & Annegarn, Harold J. & Klausbruckner, Carmen, 2016. "Assessing emissions levels and costs associated with climate and air pollution policies in South Africa," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 160-170.
    8. Thomson, Harriet & Snell, Carolyn, 2013. "Quantifying the prevalence of fuel poverty across the European Union," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 563-572.
    9. Sadath, Anver C. & Acharya, Rajesh H., 2017. "Assessing the extent and intensity of energy poverty using Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index: Empirical evidence from households in India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 540-550.
    10. repec:gam:jeners:v:9:y:2016:i:4:p:276:d:67828 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Maciej Lis & Katarzyna Salach & Konstancja Swiecicka, 2016. "Heterogeneity of the fuel poor in Poland – quantification and policy implications," IBS Working Papers 08/2016, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
    12. Galvin, Ray & Sunikka-Blank, Minna, 2016. "Quantification of (p)rebound effects in retrofit policies – Why does it matter?," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 415-424.
    13. Font Vivanco, David & Kemp, René & van der Voet, Ester, 2016. "How to deal with the rebound effect? A policy-oriented approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 114-125.
    14. Galvin, Ray, 2015. "The rebound effect, gender and social justice: A case study in Germany," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 759-769.
    15. Colenbrander, Sarah & Gouldson, Andy & Sudmant, Andrew Heshedahl & Papargyropoulou, Effie, 2015. "The economic case for low-carbon development in rapidly growing developing world cities: A case study of Palembang, Indonesia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 24-35.
    16. repec:eee:juipol:v:51:y:2018:i:c:p:41-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Gunningham, Neil, 2013. "Managing the energy trilemma: The case of Indonesia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 184-193.
    18. repec:eee:trapol:v:65:y:2018:i:c:p:114-125 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. repec:eee:trapol:v:59:y:2017:i:c:p:93-105 is not listed on IDEAS

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