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Dynamic carbon caps. Splitting the bill: A fairer solution post-Kyoto?

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  • Catton, Will

Abstract

A dynamic carbon cap scheme is described and illustrated using a future growth scenario. This scheme, called a "bill-splitting dynamic carbon cap," uses national carbon caps that change in a manner designed to distribute burden equitably, and at the same time to encourage and feed off economic growth. This is achieved by distributing emission-reduction obligations away from the growers, and onto the emitters. The global emission-reduction response is thereby pegged to global growth.

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  • Catton, Will, 2009. "Dynamic carbon caps. Splitting the bill: A fairer solution post-Kyoto?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5636-5649, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:12:p:5636-5649
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    Cited by:

    1. Meckler, Sacha Rene, 2017. "Causes and Impacts of Deficient Liability for Climate Change Damage, and an Economic Conception for Climate Change Liability That Supports Appropriate Action: DRaCULA," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 288-298.

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