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Climate modelling with endogenous technical change: Stochastic learning and optimal greenhouse gas abatement in the PAGE2002 model

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  • Alberth, Stephan
  • Hope, Chris

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  • Alberth, Stephan & Hope, Chris, 2007. "Climate modelling with endogenous technical change: Stochastic learning and optimal greenhouse gas abatement in the PAGE2002 model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 1795-1807, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:35:y:2007:i:3:p:1795-1807
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Popp, David, 2004. "ENTICE: endogenous technological change in the DICE model of global warming," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 742-768, July.
    2. van der Zwaan, Bob & Rabl, Ari, 2004. "The learning potential of photovoltaics: implications for energy policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(13), pages 1545-1554, September.
    3. Peterson, Sonja, 2006. "Uncertainty and economic analysis of climate change: a survey of approaches and findings," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 3778, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Junginger, M. & Faaij, A. & Turkenburg, W. C., 2005. "Global experience curves for wind farms," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 133-150, January.
    5. Papineau, Maya, 2006. "An economic perspective on experience curves and dynamic economies in renewable energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 422-432, March.
    6. Rubin, Edward S & Taylor, Margaret R & Yeh, Sonia & Hounshell, David A, 2004. "Learning curves for environmental technology and their importance for climate policy analysis," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1551-1559.
    7. Loschel, Andreas, 2002. "Technological change in economic models of environmental policy: a survey," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2-3), pages 105-126, December.
    8. Alberth, S. & Hope, C., 2006. "Developing the PAGE2002 Model with Endogenous Technical Change," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0632, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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    Cited by:

    1. Grubb, M. & Mercure, J. & Salas, P. & Lange, R., 2018. "Systems Innovation, Inertia and Pliability: A mathematical exploration with implications for climate change abatement," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1819, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Rezai, Armon & van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2014. "Abandoning Fossil Fuel: How Fast And How Much?," CEPR Discussion Papers 9921, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Armon Rezai & Frederick Ploeg, 2017. "Second-Best Renewable Subsidies to De-carbonize the Economy: Commitment and the Green Paradox," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 66(3), pages 409-434, March.
    4. Ackerman, Frank & Stanton, Elizabeth A. & Hope, Chris & Alberth, Stephane, 2009. "Did the Stern Review underestimate US and global climate damages?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 2717-2721, July.
    5. Nemet, Gregory F., 2009. "Interim monitoring of cost dynamics for publicly supported energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 825-835, March.
    6. Partridge, Ian, 2013. "Renewable electricity generation in India—A learning rate analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 906-915.
    7. In Hwang & Frédéric Reynès & Richard Tol, 2013. "Climate Policy Under Fat-Tailed Risk: An Application of Dice," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 56(3), pages 415-436, November.
    8. Patrick Breun & Magnus Fröhling & Konrad Zimmer & Frank Schultmann, 2017. "Analyzing investment strategies under changing energy and climate policies: an interdisciplinary bottom-up approach regarding German metal industries," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 87(1), pages 5-39, January.
    9. repec:eee:eneeco:v:65:y:2017:i:c:p:16-31 is not listed on IDEAS

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