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Availability of financial services and income inequality: The evidence from many countries

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  • Mookerjee, Rajen
  • Kalipioni, Paul

Abstract

Using a sample of developed and developing countries this study empirically gauges the impact of the availability of financial services, as measured by the number of bank branches per 100,000 populations on income inequality. The results show that greater access to bank branches robustly reduces income inequality across countries. The study also documents that barriers to bank access significantly increases income inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Mookerjee, Rajen & Kalipioni, Paul, 2010. "Availability of financial services and income inequality: The evidence from many countries," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 404-408, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ememar:v:11:y:2010:i:4:p:404-408
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Thorsten Beck & Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Maria Soledad Martinez Peria, 2008. "Banking Services for Everyone? Barriers to Bank Access and Use around the World," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(3), pages 397-430, November.
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    7. repec:hrv:faseco:30728041 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Georg R. G. Clarke & Lixin Colin Xu & Heng-fu Zou, 2006. "Finance and Income Inequality: What Do the Data Tell Us?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 578-596, January.
    9. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Newman, Andrew F, 1993. "Occupational Choice and the Process of Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 274-298, April.
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    12. Beck, Thorsten & Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Levine, Ross, 2004. "Finance, inequality, and poverty: cross-country evidence," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3338, The World Bank.
    13. Akhter, Selim & Daly, Kevin J., 2009. "Finance and poverty: Evidence from fixed effect vector decomposition," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 191-206, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rémi Bazillier & Jérôme Hericourt, 2017. "The Circular Relationship Between Inequality, Leverage, And Financial Crises," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(2), pages 463-496, April.
    2. Rémi Bazillier & Jérôme Héricourt, 2014. "The Circular Relationship between Inequality, Leverage, and Financial Crises: Intertwined Mechanisms and Competing Evidence," Working Papers 2014-22, CEPII research center.
    3. Heshmati, Almas & Kim, Jungsuk, 2014. "A Survey of the Role of Fiscal Policy in Addressing Income Inequality, Poverty Reduction and Inclusive Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 8119, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Wamboye, Evelyn & Mookerjee, Rajen, 2013. "Financial development and manufactured exports: the african experience," MPRA Paper 46474, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Bezemer, Dirk & Samarina, Anna, 2016. "Debt Shift, Financial Development and Income Inequality in Europe," Research Report 16020-GEM, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    6. Ahmed, Azleen Rosemy & Masih, Mansur, 2017. "What is the link between financial development and income inequality? evidence from Malaysia," MPRA Paper 79416, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Cole, Rebel & Cumming, Douglas & Li, Dan, 2016. "Do banks or VCs spur small firm growth?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 60-72.
    8. Denvil Duncan & Klara Sabirianova Peter, 2016. "Unequal inequalities: Do progressive taxes reduce income inequality?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(4), pages 762-783, August.
    9. Aïssata COULIBALY, 2016. "Revisiting the Relationship between Financial Development and Child Labor in Developing Countries: Do Inequality and Institutions Matter?," Working Papers 201619, CERDI.
    10. Claessens, Stijn & Yurtoglu, B. Burcin, 2013. "Corporate governance in emerging markets: A survey," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(C), pages 1-33.

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