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Can supply create its own demand? Implications for rising skill differentials

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  • Machin, Stephen
  • Manning, Alan

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  • Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1997. "Can supply create its own demand? Implications for rising skill differentials," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 507-516, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:41:y:1997:i:3-5:p:507-516
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Machin, Stephen, 1996. "Wage Inequality in the UK," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 47-64, Spring.
    2. Lawrence F. Katz & Kevin M. Murphy, 1992. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963–1987: Supply and Demand Factors," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 35-78.
    3. Daron Acemoglu, 1999. "Changes in Unemployment and Wage Inequality: An Alternative Theory and Some Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1259-1278, December.
    4. Russell Cooper & Andrew John, 1988. "Coordinating Coordination Failures in Keynesian Models," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(3), pages 441-463.
    5. Daron Acemoglu, 1996. "A Microfoundation for Social Increasing Returns in Human Capital Accumulation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 779-804.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Asa Rosén & Etienne Wasmer, 2005. "Higher Education Levels, Firms' Outside Options and the Wage Structure," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 19(4), pages 621-654, December.
    2. James Albrecht & Susan Vroman, 2002. "A Matching Model with Endogenous Skill Requirements," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 43(1), pages 283-305, February.
    3. Léné, Alexandre, 2011. "Occupational downgrading and bumping down: The combined effects of education and experience," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 257-269, April.
    4. Fabio Aricò, 2009. "Both Sides of the Story: Skill-biased Technological Change, Labour Market Frictions, and Endogenous Two-Sided Heterogeneity," CDMA Working Paper Series 200908, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    5. Kiley, Michael T, 1999. "The Supply of Skilled Labour and Skill-Biased Technological Progress," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(458), pages 708-724, October.
    6. Shaukat Hameed Khan, 2009. "Making People Employable: Reforming Secondary Education in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 48(4), pages 603-617.
    7. Pablo Burriel-Llombart & Jonathan Thomas, 2001. "Skill imbalances in the UK labour market: 1979-99," Bank of England working papers 145, Bank of England.
    8. Tse, Chung Yi, 2002. "Monopoly, employment and wages," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(5), pages 681-697, November.
    9. Sharma, Kishor & Oczkowski, Edward & Hicks, John, 2016. "Skill shortages in regional Australia: A local perspective from the Riverina," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 34-44.
    10. Andrés J. Marchante & Bienvenido Ortega & Ricardo Pagán, 2005. "Determinants of Skills Shortages and Hard-to-Fill Vacancies in the Hospitality Sector," ERSA conference papers ersa05p21, European Regional Science Association.
    11. Paul Auerbach & Peter Skott, "undated". "Skill Asymmetries, Increasing Wage Inequality and Unemployment," Economics Working Papers 2000-18, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    12. Sandén, Klas, 2007. "Risk, Occupational Choice, and Inequality," Working Papers in Economics 263, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    13. Fang, Chen-ray & Huang, Li-hsuan & Wang, Ming-cheng, 2008. "Technology spillover and wage inequality," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 137-147, January.

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