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Determinants of Skills Shortages and Hard-to-Fill Vacancies in the Hospitality Sector

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  • Andrés J. Marchante

    ()

  • Bienvenido Ortega

    ()

  • Ricardo Pagán

    ()

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyse the regional determinants of hard-to-fill vacancies and skills shortages in the hospitality sector. The data source for this study was generated in the year 2000 and includes information on 181 hotels and 121 restaurants in Andalusia. The results of the estimations show that hourly net wages are the main instrument firms use to reduce hard-to-fill vacancies and skills shortages. However, there are several factors affecting the conditions of local labour markets — such as unemployment rates, the level of business activity, real estate prices and the location of the firm in relation to the main regional tourism destinations — that have a significant effect on the probability of having hard-to-fill vacancies and skills shortages.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrés J. Marchante & Bienvenido Ortega & Ricardo Pagán, 2005. "Determinants of Skills Shortages and Hard-to-Fill Vacancies in the Hospitality Sector," ERSA conference papers ersa05p21, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa05p21
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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa05/papers/21.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Haskel, Jonathan & Martin, Christopher, 1993. "The Causes of Skill Shortages in Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(4), pages 573-588, October.
    2. Burgess, Simon M, 1992. "A Search Model with Job Changing Costs: 'Eurosclerosis' and Unemployment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(1), pages 75-88, January.
    3. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    4. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 7-72, March.
    5. Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1997. "Can supply create its own demand? Implications for rising skill differentials," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 507-516, April.
    6. Mortensen, Dale T., 1987. "Job search and labor market analysis," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 15, pages 849-919 Elsevier.
    7. Bosworth, Derek, 1993. "Skill Shortages in Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 40(3), pages 241-271, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Soonae Park & Byung-Yeon Kim & Wonchang Jang & Kyung-Min Nam, 2014. "Imperfect information and labor market bias against small and medium-sized enterprises: a Korean case," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 725-741, October.
    2. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:49-56 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Malo, Miguel A. & Muñoz-Bullón, Fernando, 2008. "Working career progress in the tourism industry : temp-to perm transitions in Spain," DEE - Working Papers. Business Economics. WB wb083510, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía de la Empresa.

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