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Job displacement and financial outcomes

Author

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  • Aaronson, Daniel
  • Agarwal, Sumit
  • Hotchkiss, Julie L.
  • Kelley, Taylor

Abstract

Using two proprietary datasets on earnings and credit outcomes, this paper finds that both high- and low-earners take a significant and persistent hit to income after job displacement. But these losses only translate into worse credit conditions – higher credit card utilization, lower FICO scores, and a pick up in the rate of card accounts that are delinquent or over limit – among low- earners. We observe no negative implications among higher income households, providing novel empirical evidence of the economically disparate impact of job loss.

Suggested Citation

  • Aaronson, Daniel & Agarwal, Sumit & Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Kelley, Taylor, 2019. "Job displacement and financial outcomes," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 177(C), pages 18-21.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:177:y:2019:i:c:p:18-21
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2019.01.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hotchkiss, Julie L. & Moore, Robert E. & Rios-Avila, Fernando, 2020. "Cost of policy choices: A microsimulation analysis of the impact on family welfare of unemployment and price changes," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    2. Daniel Aaronson & Brian J. Phelan, 2020. "The Evolution of Technological Substitution in Low-Wage Labor Markets," Working Paper Series WP-2020-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, revised 01 Mar 2022.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Displacement; Credit constraints; Administrative data; Unemployment; Mass layoff;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings

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