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Employment effects of Thanksgiving timing

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  • Urbatsch, R.

Abstract

In the United States, the period between Thanksgiving and Christmas has long seen the most intense consumer sales and hence the most active economy. This period varies in length depending on the date of Thanksgiving. Years where it is longer see detectably larger seasonal increases in national employment figures, so that an earlier Thanksgiving appears to serve as economic stimulus in the labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Urbatsch, R., 2013. "Employment effects of Thanksgiving timing," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 119(1), pages 42-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:119:y:2013:i:1:p:42-44
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.01.018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Levy, Daniel & Müller, Georg & Chen, Haipeng (Allan) & Bergen, Mark & Dutta, Shantanu, 2010. "Holiday Price Rigidity and Cost of Price Adjustment," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 172-198.
    2. Leo Kahane, 2009. "It’s the economy, and then some: modeling the presidential vote with state panel data," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 139(3), pages 343-356, June.
    3. Barsky, Robert B & Miron, Jeffrey A, 1989. "The Seasonal Cycle and the Business Cycle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(3), pages 503-534, June.
    4. Basker, Emek, 2005. "'Twas four weeks before Christmas: Retail sales and the length of the Christmas shopping season," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 89(3), pages 317-322, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Retail; Sales; Calendar; Holiday;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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