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Public smoking bans and self-assessed health: Evidence from Great Britain

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  • Wildman, John
  • Hollingsworth, Bruce

Abstract

Smoking bans in public places are considered an important public health intervention. The impact of such bans on health, and especially self-reported health, has not been widely considered in the literature. This paper investigates the impact of a public smoking ban on self-reported health status in Great Britain. We find that there are benefits for non-smoking women, but no benefits for smokers.

Suggested Citation

  • Wildman, John & Hollingsworth, Bruce, 2013. "Public smoking bans and self-assessed health: Evidence from Great Britain," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 209-212.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:118:y:2013:i:1:p:209-212
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2012.10.019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kanaka D. Shetty & Thomas DeLeire & Chapin White & Jayanta Bhattacharya, 2011. "Changes in U.S. hospitalization and mortality rates following smoking bans," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(1), pages 6-28, December.
    2. Jones, A & Laporte, A & Rice, N & Zucchelli, E, 2011. "A model of the impact of smoking bans on smoking with evidence from bans in England and Scotland," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 11/05, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Anger, Silke & Kvasnicka, Michael & Siedler, Thomas, 2011. "One Last Puff? Public Smoking Bans and Smoking Behavior," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 591-601.
    4. Scott Adams & Chad Cotti & Daniel Fuhrmann, 2013. "The short-term impact of smoke-free workplace laws on fatal heart attacks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(11), pages 1381-1393, April.
    5. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2010. "The Effect of Bans and Taxes on Passive Smoking," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-32, January.
    6. Abadie, Alberto & Diamond, Alexis & Hainmueller, Jens, 2010. "Synthetic Control Methods for Comparative Case Studies: Estimating the Effect of California’s Tobacco Control Program," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 493-505.
    7. Sargent, R P & Shepard, R M & Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D., 2004. "Reduced incidence of admissions for myocardial infarction associated with public smoking ban: before and after study," University of California at San Francisco, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education qt3276d6r6, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, UC San Francisco.
    8. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Warner, Kenneth E., 2000. "The economics of smoking," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 29, pages 1539-1627 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marti, Joachim & Schläpfer, Jörg, 2014. "The economic impact of Swiss smoking bans on the hospitality sector," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(1), pages 136-139.
    2. Daniel Kuehnle & Christoph Wunder, 2013. "The effects of smoking bans on self-assessed health: evidence from Germany," Working Papers 140, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Smoking ban; Natural experiment; Self-assessed health; Panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation

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