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Individual heterogeneity in returns to education in urban China during 1995-2002


  • Zhu, Rong


This paper analyzes the individual-level differences in returns to education in urban China from 1995 to 2002. We have uncovered substantial heterogeneity in schooling coefficients, and we find that the extent of heterogeneity diminishes over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhu, Rong, 2011. "Individual heterogeneity in returns to education in urban China during 1995-2002," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 113(1), pages 84-87, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:113:y:2011:i:1:p:84-87

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Daniel J. Henderson & Alexandre Olbrecht & Solomon W. Polachek, 2006. "Do Former College Athletes Earn More at Work?: A Nonparametric Assessment," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(3).
    2. Yang, Dennis Tao, 2005. "Determinants of schooling returns during transition: Evidence from Chinese cities," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 244-264, June.
    3. James J. Heckman & Xuesong Li, 2004. "Selection bias, comparative advantage and heterogeneous returns to education: evidence from China in 2000," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 155-171, October.
    4. Dong, Xiao-yuan & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2009. "Labor restructuring in China: Toward a functioning labor market," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2), pages 287-305, June.
    5. John Knight & Lina Song, 2003. "Increasing urban wage inequality in China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(4), pages 597-619, December.
    6. Henderson, Daniel J. & Polachek, Solomon W. & Wang, Le, 2011. "Heterogeneity in schooling rates of return," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1202-1214.
    7. Liu, Zhiqiang, 1998. "Earnings, Education, and Economic Reforms in Urban China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(4), pages 697-725, July.
    8. Qi Li & Jeffrey Scott Racine, 2006. "Nonparametric Econometrics: Theory and Practice," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8355.
    9. Li, Haizheng, 2003. "Economic transition and returns to education in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 317-328, June.
    10. Haizheng Li & Yi Luo, 2004. "Reporting errors, ability heterogeneity, and returns to schooling in China," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 191-207, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Deniz Baglan & Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2016. "Financial Health and the Intensive Margin of Trade," Working Papers 1607, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
    2. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2013. "Income and Wealth Distribution with Physical and Human Capital Accumulation: Extending the Uzawa-Lucas Model to a Heterogeneous Households Economy," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 50(2), pages 257-287, November.
    3. Wang, Xiaojun & Fleisher, Belton M. & Li, Haizheng & Li, Shi, 2014. "Access to college and heterogeneous returns to education in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 78-92.
    4. Yao, Yang, 2014. "The Chinese Growth Miracle," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 7, pages 943-1031 Elsevier.
    5. Wei-Bin Zhang, 2013. "A Synthesis Of The Uzawa-Lucas Model With The Walrasian-General-Equilibrium And Neoclassical-Growth Theories," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 58(199), pages 7-38, October -.


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