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Investigating the asymptotic properties of import elasticity estimates

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  • Soderbery, Anson

Abstract

Feenstra (1994) is widely implemented in international trade to estimate elasticities of substitution. Through a Monte Carlo experiment, simulated estimates suggest substantial biases due to weak instruments. However, the derivation of the elasticity of substitution drastically mitigates these biases.

Suggested Citation

  • Soderbery, Anson, 2010. "Investigating the asymptotic properties of import elasticity estimates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 57-62, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:109:y:2010:i:2:p:57-62
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hansen, Lars Peter, 1982. "Large Sample Properties of Generalized Method of Moments Estimators," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(4), pages 1029-1054, July.
    2. Christian Broda & David E. Weinstein, 2006. "Globalization and the Gains From Variety," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 541-585.
    3. Bruce A. Blonigen & Anson Soderbery, 2009. "Measuring the Benefits of Product Variety with an Accurate Variety Set," NBER Working Papers 14956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Feenstra, Robert C, 1994. "New Product Varieties and the Measurement of International Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 157-177, March.
    5. Fuller, Wayne A, 1977. "Some Properties of a Modification of the Limited Information Estimator," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(4), pages 939-953, May.
    6. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantins Benkovskis & Julia Wörz, 2016. "Non-price competitiveness of exports from emerging countries," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(2), pages 707-735, September.
    2. Lukas Mohler & Michael Seitz, 2012. "The gains from variety in the European Union," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 148(3), pages 475-500, September.
    3. Lisa Aspalter, 2016. "Estimating Industry-level Armington Elasticities For EMU Countries," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp217, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    4. Benkovskis, Konstantins & Wörz, Julia, 2013. "What drives the market share changes? : Price versus non-price factors," BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2013, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    5. David Hummels & Kwan Yong Lee, 2017. "The Income Elasticity of Import Demand: Micro Evidence and An Application," NBER Working Papers 23338, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Konstantins Benkovskis & Julia Wörz, 2014. "How does taste and quality impact on import prices?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(4), pages 665-691, November.
    7. Aspalter, Lisa, 2016. "Estimating Industry-level Armington Elasticities For EMU Countries," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 4838, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    8. Nikhil Patel, 2016. "International Trade Finance and the Cost Channel of Monetary Policy in Open Economies," BIS Working Papers 539, Bank for International Settlements.
    9. Wörz, Julia & Benkovskis, Konstantins, 2015. ""Made in China" - How does it affect our understanding of global market shares?," Working Paper Series 1787, European Central Bank.
    10. Vahagn Galstyan, 2016. "LIML Estimation of Import Demand and Export Supply Elasticities," Trinity Economics Papers tep0316, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2016.
    11. Kamal Saggi & Halis Murat Yildiz & Andrey Stoyanov, 2015. "Do free trade agreements affect tariffs of non-member countries? A theoretical and empirical investigation," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 15-00010, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    12. Hillberry, Russell & Hummels, David, 2013. "Trade Elasticity Parameters for a Computable General Equilibrium Model," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    13. Konstantins Benkovskis & Julia Woerz, 2014. ""Made in China" - How Does it Affect Measures of Competitiveness?," Working Papers 2014/04, Latvijas Banka.
    14. Blonigen, Bruce A. & Soderbery, Anson, 2010. "Measuring the benefits of foreign product variety with an accurate variety set," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 168-180, November.
    15. Soderbery, Anson, 2015. "Estimating import supply and demand elasticities: Analysis and implications," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 1-17.

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